Workshop with Professor Roland Greene on September 1st

We are pleased to announce a special workshop with Professor Roland Greene (Stanford, English Department) on Friday, September 1st. Professor Greene will be our guest on that day for an informal meeting with PhD students and other researchers to talk about ‘How Poetry Remakes the World: Elegy and Epithalamion in Renaissance Poetics’.

In the era of early modern humanism, classical lyric genres such as elegy and epithalamion not only follow received uses but become newly scripted as a negotiation between past and present. Concentrating on these two representative genres, this workshop is an experiment in a revived genre criticism that seeks to recover, in terms of indigenous to the period, how early modern poets and audiences conceived these and other genres at work in their world.

After a short introduction by Professor Greene we will have a discussion about the above mentioned issues. In advance we will read an article of Professor Greene about the early modern elegy and literature as a negation between past and present. Participants also are invited to shortly present their own research projects and questions they are currently dealing with in the second part of the workshop.

The workshop will take place on Friday, September 1st, 2-4 PM in the meeting room 110.060 (Blandijnberg, 1st Floor). You are most cordially invited to attend the workshop. Please confirm your attendance as soon as possible by sending an e-mail to Cornelis.vanderHaven@UGent.be .

Roland Greene is an expert on the early modern literatures of England, Latin Europe and the Trans-Atlantic world. His research pays particular attention to the history of poetry and poetics from the Renaissance to the present day. This year he serves as the president of the Modern Language Association. His theme for the 2016 Annual Convention is “Literature and its Publics: Past, Present, and Future”. His most recent book is Five Words: Critical Semantics in the Age of Shakespeare and Cervantes (Chicago, 2013). Five Words proposes an understanding of early modern culture through the changes embodied in five words or concepts over the sixteenth century: in English, bloodinvention language resistance, and world, and their counterparts in French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese. In the seminar he will be discussing this book next to the history and theory of the poetry of the Americas. The seminar is open to all PhD student

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