GEMS Seminar: Atelier with Fabio della Schiava and Kevin Dekoster

Time: Thursday, 25 October (10-12 AM)

Location: Faculty Library Arts and Philosophy, Magnel wing, Room “Freddy Mortier”.

Fabio della Schiava (UGent / KU Leuven)
Toward a critical edition of Biondo Flavio’s Roma instaurata.  

Published in 1446 by Biondo Flavio, one of the most distinguished historians of the Italian Quattrocento, Roma instaurata is an account in Latin of the archeological remains of ancient and christian Rome. Because of its centrality both for scholars of Humanism and Archeology, Roma instaurata has been repeatedly published between the Fifteenth and the Twenty-first century but still lacks a critical edition able to provide the reader with a reliable text and a better knowledge of Biondo’s antiquarian methodology. This edition has been now partially accomplished thanks to a 3 years project sponsored by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and undertaken at Bonn University. The paper aims to share the results of this research with a focus on the philological problems which have been encountered and the applied methodology to solve them. 

Kevin Dekoster (UGent)
From Dissecting Table to Courtroom. The Professionalisation of Medico-Legal Expertise in the Early Modern County of Flanders (16th-18th Centuries)

Thanks to figures such as Andreas Vesalius and Jan Palfijn, scholars of the early modern Habsburg Netherlands can justifiably claim an important role for this region in the historiography on the professionalisation of medicine. However, the development of medical expertise within a forensic context remains largely unknown terrain. Taking the County of Flanders as its geographical focus, this research project aims to analyse and explain quantitative and qualitative developments in the importance of medico-legal expertise to the functioning of early modern systems of criminal justice. This objective will primarily be achieved by a study of the form and content of autopsy and other medico-legal reports produced by medical experts, such as surgeons and physicians, who were consulted by law courts and other representatives of early modern governmental power. In order to present an analysis that is as multi-faceted and nuanced as possible, evidence from a wide range of legal bodies at different institutional levels (provincial versus local) and with varying territorial jurisdictions (urban versus rural) will be considered.

Image reference: Joos De Damhouder, Pracktycke in criminele saken, seer nut ende profijtelijck allen souverains, bailjous, borgemeesters, ende schepenen etc., Rotterdam, Pieter van Waesberge, 1650. This is the only iconographical representation of a judicial autopsy, that the speaker could find for the Netherlands so far.

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GEMS in portraits: Andrew Bricker

This week, I sat down with Andrew Bricker to talk about his research, his work at UGent and his forthcoming book about satire and defamation law; we ended up talking a lot about our shared astonishment at Belgian traffic behaviour and the things we have come to love about Ghent. As an assistant professor in English Literature, Andrew is an expert on satire from the early modern period, but his interests extend to material culture and cognitive approaches to reading. After having studied and worked in Toronto, Prague, Stanford, Montreal and Vancouver, Andrew finally settled in Ghent last year. Now he is sharing his excitement about “old books” with Flemish students (“who are really great, but don’t talk very much – yet when they do talk they have very interesting things to say!”), working on his book Libel and Lampoon: Satire in the Courts, 1670-1792, and learning Dutch (which goes “heel goed!”) while exploring Belgium on his bike on the weekends.  Continue reading

International conference Law & order. The role of the institutions in creating the legislation in the Low Countries (1500­‐1700s)

law and order

The international conference Law & order. The role of the institutions in creating the legislation in the Low Countries (1500-1700) will take place in Brussels on Thursday, October 18th, 2018. Please find the PDF with additional information here. The conference is co-organised by GEMS member Annemieke Romein. It is a one-day workshop that aims at shedding light on a phenomenon that is crucial for the early modern period but has remained poorly studied. This day will unite researchers from both Belgium and the Netherlands.

 

GEMS Lecture 2018 with Professor Craig Martin (Università Ca’ Foscari, Venice)

Astrological Debates in Italian Renaissance Commentaries on Aristotle’s Meteorology

Date: Friday, 5 October 2018
Time: 4 PM
Location: Room 100.072 Blandijnberg 2, Gent

Astrologia, Giulio Bonasone, naar Rafaël, 1544From the time of Albertus Magnus, medieval commentators on Aristotle regularly used a passage from Meteorology 1.2 as evidence that the stars and planets influence and even govern terrestrial events. Many of these commentators integrated their readings of this work with the view that planetary conjunctions were causes of significant changes in human affairs. By the end of the sixteenth century, Italian Aristotelian commentators and astrologers alike deemed this passage as authoritative for the integration of astrology with natural philosophy. Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, however, criticized this reading, contending that Aristotle never used the science of the stars to explain meteorological phenomena. While some Italian commentators, such as Pietro Pomponazzi dismissed Pico’s contentions, by the middle of the sixteenth century many reevaluated the medieval integration. This reevaluation culminated in Cesare Cremonini, who put forth an extensive critique of astrology in which he argued against the idea of occult causation and celestial influence, as he tried to rid Aristotelianism of its medieval legacy.

Admission to this public lecture is free, but pre-registration is recommended for anyone who is not a member of GEMS – please send a message to: gems_ugent@yahoo.com

Image: Astrologia (1544) by Giulio Bonasone after Raphael. Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

 

PhD defense Delphine Calle

On Tuesday 21 August, GEMS member Delphine Calle will defend her doctoral thesis “Amour et applaudissements. La passion amoureuse, ses pièges et son succès dans les tragédies de Racine”. The defense starts at 1pm and will take place in Het Pand (room August Vermeylen). Please confirm your attendance to the reception afterwards (around 3pm) via this link.

Racine_-_Bérénice_Act5_sc7_1676_-_césar

CANCELLED – Lecture Michael Moriarty – Pascal, Diversion, and the Quest for Happiness

Unfortunately, the lecture by Michael Moriarty has been cancelled.

moriarty

Michael Moriarty is Drapers Professor of French at the University of Cambridge, professorial fellow of Peterhouse. He works chiefly on the literature and thought of the early modern period. His publications include a book on Roland Barthes (Cambridge: Politiy, 1992), Taste and Ideology in Seventeenth-Century France (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988, reprinted 2009Early Modern French Thought: The Age of Suspicion (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003); Fallen Nature, Fallen Selves: Early Modern French Thought II (OUP, 2006), and Disguised Vices: Theories of Virtue in Early Modern French Thought (OUP, 2011). He has also translated Descartes’s Meditations on First Philosophy (Oxford World’s Classics, 2008). He was formerly Centenary Professor of French Literature and Thought at Queen Mary, University of London. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes Académiques.

GEMS in portraits: Thomas Donald Jacobs

GEMS in portraits Thomas Donald JacobsLast week, I had a pleasant and interesting meeting with Thomas Donald Jacobs from the History Department at Ghent University. Thomas is a doctoral student and a teaching and research assistant. He specializes in Early Modern European discourses about the Americas, as well as the politics and diplomacy of that era. His particular interests lie in border-crossing, the negotiation and representation of Jewish and Native American identity, Charles V’s policies towards New Christians, and Anglo-Hispanic relations during the mid-seventeenth century. In April, he co-organized the 39th American Indian Workshop “Arrows of Time: Narrating the Past and Present” together with GEMS member Michael Limberger, and Fien Lauwaerts. The conference was a success and caused “just the right amount of controversy”.

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GEMS Research Day, Thursday 31 May

Man bij studeervertrek, Jan Luyken, 1689 (Rijksmuseum Amsterdam)

On 31 May, GEMS will organize its first Research Day in cooperation with RELICS. During that day, we will discuss together some topical questions concerning the state of scholarly research today, especially in regard to issues that concern younger scholars, like the current state of PhD and postdoc research, publishing strategies and more in general about what actually motivates us in doing research and which role research plays in our lives.

Anyone who is interested in these issues is invited to take part in the morning and/or afternoon programme of this research day, with a workshop about PhD research in the morning and a panel discussion and interview with Kate Belsey in the afternoon, about publication strategies and the state of scholarship in 2018.

 

PLEASE REGISTER for this research day by conforming your attendance to: gems_ugent@yahoo.com Please indicate in your message if you would like to take part in the morning programme, the afternoon programme, or both.

 

PROGRAMME – Location: Plateau-building, Plateaustraat 22, Ghent

Simon Stevin Room (Plateau building)

10:30-13:00: Workshop about PhD research in 2018: three colleagues who are now in the final stage of their PhD projects will tell about how their research developed over time, what decisions they made in their research, also in regard to their academic network, attendance of conferences and publication of papers and how they see their scholarly future after taking their PhD. Presentations by: Delphine Calle, Michiel Van Dam (both UGent) and Frederik Knegtel (University of Leiden)

13:00-14:00: Lunch

Jozef Plateau Room (Plateau building)

14:00-15:30: Publish or publish? Panel discussion with: Neil Badmington (Cardiff University, author and journal editor Barthes Studies), Tiffany Bousard (journal editor Early Modern Low Countries), Erika Gaffney (publisher Amsterdam University Press) and Teodoro Katinis (UGent, author).

The panel will discuss, from different perspectives (authors, journal editors, academic publishers), different issues that determine the current publication culture in humanities scholarship. How do publishers go about in their selection of books and edited collections? Which advice can they give to young scholars new to the scene? How do publishers and journal editors deal with peer-review processes, with electronic publications, with Open Access requirements, with the bibliometric ‘imperative’,…? What advice can experienced scholars, who have published internationally, give to younger scholars in the field, with respect to article submissions and/or book proposals?

15.30-16.00: Coffee break

Jozef Plateau Room (Plateau building)

16.00-17.30: What Do We Mean by Research? (And why do we do it?)

Research forms a substantial component of an academic’s duties and takes up the majority of a PhD student’s time. It is easy to take this for granted. But what do we mean by research and why do we allot it a major role in our lives?

In an informal discussion chaired by Prof. Catherine Belsey, questions might include the following. What motivates research? Curiosity, fame, promotion, changing the world? Does research in the humanities make a difference? If no further research took place in our field, would it matter? If so, why?

Does research influence teaching? Does teaching influence research? Or are the two skills independent of one another? Since they compete for attention, are they in conflict?

Where does a research project start? From a puzzle, a hypothesis, desire for a fuller picture, discontent with existing views? What defines good research?

17.30-….: Wine and Beer Reception

Studying Past and Present Performances

On May 17th and 18th, professor Philip Auslander (Georgia Institute of Technology) was invited as a lecturer at the Doctoral Schools specialist course Studying Past and Present Performances. Find more information about it here. The course was organised and moderated by GEMS-member Kornee van der Haven and Katharina Pewny (THALIA), in cooperation with Tessa Vannieuwenhuyze (UGent/VUB), Sarah Adams (UGent) and Yannice De Bruyn (UGent). The participants to the course formed a very diverse group, whose research interests ranged from performance and theatre studies to conflict and development. At the initiative of Eun Kyoung Shin (UGent), the course was concluded with a group picture, that we are happy to share here. From left to right on the upper row: Kornee van der Haven, Katharina Pewny, Antia Díaz Otero (ULB), Lucas Trouillard (ULB), Kelsey Onderdijk (UGent), Sophie van den Berg (UGent), Sarah Adams, Jeroen Billiet (HoGent), Renée Vulto (UGent), Sreya Dutt (UGent), Tan Tan (Sun Weiwei) (UGent), Julian Kuttig (UGent). From left to right on the lower row: Eun Kyoung Shin, Caterina Mora (A.PASS), Yannice De Bruyn, Philip Auslander, Lieze Roels (UAntwerpen), Tessa Vannieuwenhuyze.

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GEMS Research Day 31 May: save the date!

On Thursday 31 May, GEMS will organise a research day. In the morning we will have a workshop for PhD students. In the afternoon there will be an interview with Kate Belsey about the state of scholarship in 2018, and a panel debate about publishing strategies.

More information will follow soon!