Workshop Performance Historiography: Examining Past Performances from a Present-day Perspective (12-13 September 2019)

The application deadline has passed and a selection of participants has been made. For any inquiries, please contact renee.vulto@ugent.be.

With Henry Turner (Rutgers University) and Morag Josephine Grant (University of Edinburgh) (keynote speakers), Jane Hwang Degenhardt (University of Massachusetts Amherst), and Cornelis van der Haven (Ghent University).

DS specialist course for early career researchers on the theme of performance historiography,  organised by the interdisciplinary research groups THALIA (Ghent University and Free University of Brussels) and GEMS (Ghent University). The workshop aims to approach this theme from an interdisciplinary perspective, and to facilitate dialogue between young researchers and experts.

The workshop departs from the following: the existing body of literature on historical performance (1600-1900) is rather anecdotal and tends to focus on written sources rather than examining past performances as experiences, or as events that had a bodily or an emotional impact. In the workshop, we intend to explore how contemporary theory can help us accessing past performances, and understand their function in their historical time and space. Examples of such performances are theatrical performances, music performances, rituals, religious processions, or political demonstrations, but also broader notions performance are welcome to be discussed.

During the two days, Henry Turner and Morag Josephine Grant will each give a lecture in which they discuss performance historiography from their area of expertise. The rest of the time is designated for research presentations by the participants and discussion.

Preliminary programme
Thursday, 12 September
09:00 – 09:30 welcome and coffee
09:30 – 11:30 session 1: masterclass Henry Turner
11:30 – 13:00 session 2: discussion
13:00 – 14:00 lunch
14:00 – 16:00 session 3: presentations by participants
16:00 – 16:30 coffee
16:30 – 18:30 session 4: presentations by participants

Friday, 13 September
09:00 – 09:30 coffee
09:30 – 11:30 session 5: masterclass Morag Josephine Grant
11:30 – 13:00 session 6: discussion
13:00 – 14:00 lunch
14:00 – 16:00 session 7: presentations by participants
16:00 – 16:30 coffee
16:30 – 18:30 session 8: presentations by participants †

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GEMS in portraits: Delphine Calle

After defending her PhD on love and passion in the work of Jean Racine in the summer of 2018, GEMS-member Delphine Calle has set course for a year at Rutgers University, New Jersey. She came back to Ghent for the Christmas holidays, so I had the chance to meet her for an interview over a Pain perdu coffee. We talked about bureaucracy, modern art, Thanksgiving and her postdoc project proposal about non-peer friendship in 17th-century France: Friendship across divides. A literary exploration of friendship and equality in 17th-century France.

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GEMS feedback session on FWO PhD proposals

Workshop

Place: Blandijnberg 2, Grote Vergaderzaal (3rd floor)

Date: 6 February 2019, 14:00-16:00

Writer

​On Wednesday, February 6th, there will be a feedback session between 2 and 4 PM for students who are preparing an application of a FWO PhD fellowship. The session will take place in the Grote Vergaderzaal (Blandijnberg 2, 3rd floor).

Students who may be interested to get feedback from GEMS members on their proposal should send their drafts to: Cornelis.vanderHaven@UGent.be, before February 1st.

 

Image reference: Schrijvende boer, Cornelis Dusart, 1670 – 1704. Holding institution: Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

Representations of Violence and the Eye of the Beholder (1600-today)

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GEMS’s own Kornee van der Haven and Yannice De Bruyn, in cooperation with Karel Vanhaesebrouck (ULB/VUB/RITCS), organise the specialist course ‘Representations of Violence and the Eye of the Beholder (1600-today)’. Enabled by the Doctoral Schools, this specialist course will take place on 28 and 29 March 2019. Its focus is on how violence is represented in works of art from 1600 onwards; what it means to look at violence; and social, cultural and ethical questions concerning the representation of (extreme) violence today and during various historical periods.

This specialist course is intended for PhD students at both academic and artistic institutions, and artists. It intends to create an intense dialogue between researchers and artists, and focuses on a close interaction with art works from today and historic periods alike. Parallel to the specialist course, an exhibition will be shown in the Vandenhove Paviljoen in Ghent. A visit to the exhibition and dialogue with some of the participating artists is part of the specialist course.

More information can be found here. For more information and registration, please contact Yannice De Bruyn.

The image is from Simon Pummell’s ATLAS FOR INANIMATE BODIES.

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GEMS Seminar: Nimrod Reitman inspired by… Michelangelo & Rilke

Time: Thursday, 13 December 2018, 11 AM – 1 PM
Place: Faculty Library Arts and Philosophy, Magnel wing, room ‘Freddy Mortier’

During this GEMS seminar, Nimrod Reitman will present a short story by Rilke about Michelangelo. Both this story and Rilke’s translation of Michelangelo’s Rime will serve as a springboard for the discussion and a development of some thoughts about concepts like ‘non finito’, ‘fragment’ and ‘entombment’. Doing so, Nimrod will present the broader theoretical apparatus of his research, spanning rhetoric to psychoanalysis.

Anyone who is interested to participate and who would like to receive the text by Rilke can contact Kornee van der Haven: cornelis.vanderhaven@ugent.be

Images:
– Rainer Maria Rilke at his desk. Copyright: Bildarchiv Preußischer Kulturbesitz.
Self-portrait of Michelangelo.

Bernd Roling (Freie Universität, Berlin), “Return From the Dead: The Raising of Lazarus in Early Modern Biblical Commentaries and Natural Philosophy”

Public lecture

Time: 22 November 2018, h. 16:30

Location: KANTL (Koningstraat 18, Ghent)

Roling poster

The lecture will be the keynote of the international conference “Coordinating the two books“.

Image reference: Mattia Preti, The raising of Lazarus, 1650s. Oil on canvas. Holding institution: Galleria Nazionale di Arte Antica, Rome.

GEMS Seminar: Atelier with Jürgen Pieters & Ruben Celani

Time: 21 November 2018, 2-4 pm
Place: Faculty Library Arts and Philosophy, Magnel wing, Room “Freddy Mortier”

Jürgen Pieters (UGent)
Literature and consolation: fictions of comfort

Rijksmuseum Een lezende man anon. 1660

In my talk, I would like to present the outline of a book project that I have submitted with Edinburgh University Press. I will focus on the conceptual framework of the book, in which I hope to correlate a contemporary concern with the pragmatics of literary reading (‘bibliotherapy’, and the often voiced idea that books are there to bring comfort) with a historical analysis of this age-old critical topos.

Image reference: Anonymous, A man reading, c. 1660. Canvas. Holding institution: Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

Ruben Celani (UGent)
Fashioning personae in 16th century books of secrets

The production of the so-called books of secrets (collections of recipes on a wide range of technical subjects, but especially on practical medicine) was not a complete novelty to the 16th century Italian book market: but it was only after the publication of the Secreti del reverendo Donno Alessio Piemontese (1555), that it became one of the most popular genres in the late Renaissance. One of the factors that undoubtedly contributed to this success was the keen use of rhetorical and marketing strategies: among those, a prominent position has to be assigned to the fashioning of appealing personae. After briefly considering the multiple meanings of this word and its connections with the concept of authority, my talk will focus on which personae were fashioned in the most widespread Italian books of secrets, and especially on the strategies adopted in order to craft them, providing examples from the texts considered.

Image reference (left): Portrait of Leonardo FioravantiEngraving from his Tesoro della vita humana (Venice, heirs of Melchior Sessa, 1570).
Image reference (right): Niccolò Nelli, Portrait of Girolamo Ruscelli, 1566. Engraving.

International Conference: “Coordinating the Two Books”

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This conference examines the configuration of confessional interests and epistemic concerns at the interface of hermeneutics and science. Current historiography does not appreciate early modern Catholic endeavours in generating knowledge about the Book of Nature and the Word of God in their own right. At best, they tend to be regarded as a stepping stone to the ‘real thing’, the Protestant study of nature as an act of devotion to God. It is high time to re-integrate early modern Catholic intellectual output in the received history of ways of managing religious and natural knowledge. This conference aims to contribute to studying Catholic’s proper trajectory in aligning natural enquiry and textual authority.

Programme

22 Nov.
9h00 all welcome at KANTL
(Koningstraat 18, Ghent)
9h15 Steven Vanden Broecke
‘Introduction’
9h30 Dario Tessicini
‘The Comet and the Plague:
Catholic Astrology, Meteorology and Medicine in Early Modern Venice’
10h00 Steve Matthews
‘The Jesuits, Biblical Hermeneutics, and the Scientific Revolution’
10h30 discussion
11h00 coffee break
11h30 Jonathan Regier
‘On Providence and Natural Cause:
Reading Cardano with the Roman Inquisition’
12h00 Anthony Ossa Richardson
‘Mersenne’s Two Books’
12h30 discussion
13h00 lunch
14h30 Eric Jorink
‘Reading the Book of Nature with Cartesian Glasses:
the Cases of Johannes Swammerdam and Nicolaus Steno’
15h00 Thomas Leinkauf
‘The “Book of Nature” and strategies of persuasion’
15h30 discussion
16h00 coffee break
16h30 KEY-NOTE:
Bernd Roling
‘Return From the Dead:
The Raising of Lazarus in Early Modern Biblical Commentaries and Natural Philosophy’
19h00 dinner
23 Nov.
9h00 all welcome at Sint-Baafshuis
(Biezekapelstraat 2, Ghent)
9h30 Jetze Touber
‘Slime of the Earth:
Biblical Contours of the Human Body as Microcosm in the Early 17th century’
10h00 Sietske Fransen
‘The Role of Catholicism in the Lives and Works of Father and Son Van Helmont’
10h30 discussion
11h00 coffee break
11h30 Steven Vanden Broecke
‘Belief, Piety and Erudition in Low Countries Baroque Science:
The Case of Govaert Wendelen (1580-1667)’
12h00 Florence Hsia
‘Biblical History and the Challenge of Chinese Astronomy’
12h30 discussion
14h00 lunch
14h30 Elena Rapetti
‘Reason in the limits of Faith:
Pierre-Daniel Huet, André Graindorge, and the making of science at the Académie de physique de Caen
15h00 Scott Mandelbrote
‘Newtonian philology:
Co-ordinating the two books in early eighteenth-century Europe’
15h30 discussion
16h00 coffee break
Jetze Touber
‘Concluding Discussion’

Organized by Jetze Touber and Steven Vanden Broecke (History Department, Ghent University), in conjunction with the IEMH.

To register, please contact Jetze Touber at jetze.touber@ugent.be.

I@H Digitizing Humanities lecture on Tudor Networks of Power

On Wednesday 7 November from 3-5pm, guest speaker Dr. Ruth Ahnert, Senior Lecturer at the Queen Mary University of London will give the second lecture of the I@H lecture series on Digitizing the Humanities: Tudor Networks of Power.

Location: Faculteitsbibliotheek in the Library Lab II Mangel Wing, Rozier 44.

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Dr. Ahnert’s research employs digital methods from the field of Complex Networks to study Tudor letters. By examining the structure of the social networks of sixteenth-century correspondents, she manages to recuperate the roles of people who tend to be ignored in more traditional historical research. A famous writer or politician might have caught the headlines with a book or argument, but it often took a range of facilitators to keep the message alive. Students will learn about network analysis and see that through this method, scholars of Humanities can gain insights into complex relational processes. The approach that Dr. Ahnert will discuss in her talk is applicable for literary studies – (re)mapping actors/characters, relations to explain power through texts.

This lecture is in English. Registration is required: https://webappsx.ugent.be/eventManager/events/IatHDHlecture. Andhttps://www.facebook.com/events/2219411448299891/.

The I@H Digitizing the Humanities lecture series is targeted to all students, and staff of UGent from bachelor and masters students, PhD candidates, researchers, professors, and support staff. The goal of the lecture series is to raise awareness of the state-of-the-art digital methods currently being used and developed by humanities scholars and empower researchers to put these to work themselves. With the financial support of I@H. Please see: https://www.ghentcdh.ugent.be/content/digitising-humanities-internationalisation-home-ih-lecture-series for more information.

GEMS Seminar: Atelier with Fabio della Schiava and Kevin Dekoster

Time: Thursday, 25 October (10-12 AM)

Location: Faculty Library Arts and Philosophy, Magnel wing, Room “Freddy Mortier”.

Fabio della Schiava (UGent / KU Leuven)
Toward a critical edition of Biondo Flavio’s Roma instaurata.  

Published in 1446 by Biondo Flavio, one of the most distinguished historians of the Italian Quattrocento, Roma instaurata is an account in Latin of the archeological remains of ancient and christian Rome. Because of its centrality both for scholars of Humanism and Archeology, Roma instaurata has been repeatedly published between the Fifteenth and the Twenty-first century but still lacks a critical edition able to provide the reader with a reliable text and a better knowledge of Biondo’s antiquarian methodology. This edition has been now partially accomplished thanks to a 3 years project sponsored by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and undertaken at Bonn University. The paper aims to share the results of this research with a focus on the philological problems which have been encountered and the applied methodology to solve them. 

Kevin Dekoster (UGent)
From Dissecting Table to Courtroom. The Professionalisation of Medico-Legal Expertise in the Early Modern County of Flanders (16th-18th Centuries)

Thanks to figures such as Andreas Vesalius and Jan Palfijn, scholars of the early modern Habsburg Netherlands can justifiably claim an important role for this region in the historiography on the professionalisation of medicine. However, the development of medical expertise within a forensic context remains largely unknown terrain. Taking the County of Flanders as its geographical focus, this research project aims to analyse and explain quantitative and qualitative developments in the importance of medico-legal expertise to the functioning of early modern systems of criminal justice. This objective will primarily be achieved by a study of the form and content of autopsy and other medico-legal reports produced by medical experts, such as surgeons and physicians, who were consulted by law courts and other representatives of early modern governmental power. In order to present an analysis that is as multi-faceted and nuanced as possible, evidence from a wide range of legal bodies at different institutional levels (provincial versus local) and with varying territorial jurisdictions (urban versus rural) will be considered.

Image reference: Joos De Damhouder, Pracktycke in criminele saken, seer nut ende profijtelijck allen souverains, bailjous, borgemeesters, ende schepenen etc., Rotterdam, Pieter van Waesberge, 1650. This is the only iconographical representation of a judicial autopsy, that the speaker could find for the Netherlands so far.