Exhibition Baroque Brutalities: Imagining Violence in Art (17th Century & today)

VANDENHOVE Centre for Architecture and Arts, Rozier 1, Ghent

Thursday & Friday 28 & 29 March, 2-6 PM and Saturday 30 March, 10 AM – 5 PM.

The exhibition shows 17th-century prints from the UGent University Library and works by Simon Pummell (video), Doina Kraal and Kevin Simón Mancera Vivas (peep-show box), Abattoir Fermé (performance stills).

Poster Inger Leemans Imagineering Violence 2019 Amsterdam-02

 The early modern period witnessed a true explosion of images on pain, suffering and violence across painting, print, theater, and public space. The public had plenty to choose from: sieges, executions, massacres. Violence fascinated the early modern spectator, yet it simultaneously conjured up numerous questions, some of which are not unlike those posed today.

How can violence be represented and imagined? How can an artist document the violence of the times? What about the numerous ethical implications? When does a spectator become a voyeur? When does violence turn into spectacle? Can violence be aestheticized? Does an artist have a duty to document contemporary violence? These questions saturate modern art, from the horrors of War in Goya to the racial violence in Edward and Nancy Kienholz’s ‘Five Car Stud’.

Baroque Brutalities not only shows how violence is represented in works of art from about 1650, but it also deals with the above-mentioned social, cultural and ethical questions concerning the representation of (extreme) violence today and in the Baroque era.

This exhibition is an initiative of the Dutch-Belgian research group ITEMP: Imagineering Violence – see: https://itempviolence.wordpress.com.

Advertisements

Call for Participation -Workshop Performance Historiography: Examining Past Performances from a Present-day Perspective

With Henry Turner (Rutgers University), Jane Davidson (University of Melbourne) and Morag Josephine Grant (University of Edinburgh).

Workshop for early career researchers on the theme of performance historiography,  organised by the interdisciplinary research groups THALIA (Ghent University and Free University of Brussels) and GEMS (Ghent University). The workshop aims to approach this theme from an interdisciplinary perspective, and to facilitate dialogue between young researchers and experts.

The workshop departs from the following: the existing body of literature on historical performance is rather anecdotal and tends to focus on written sources rather than examining past performances as experiences, or as events that had a bodily or an emotional impact. In the workshop, we intend to explore how contemporary theory can help us accessing past performances, and understand their function in their historical time and space. Examples of such performances are theatrical performances, music performances, rituals, religious processions, or political demonstrations, but also broader notions performance are welcome to be discussed.

During the two days, Henry Turner, Jane Davidson and Morag Josephine Grant will each give a lecture in which they discuss performance historiography from their area of expertise. The rest of the time is designated for research presentations by the participants and discussion. Prior to the workshop, participants will be asked to send in a short paper or statement, which will be sent to the lecturers so that they are able to address some relevant issues in their lectures.

Participants may be PhD candidates, postdoctoral researchers and advanced master students from various disciplines such as (but not limited to): theatre studies, musicology, literary studies, history, anthropology, etc. To subscribe to the workshop, please send a short note on how the theme of this workshop relates to your own research interests to renee.vulto@ugent.be by March 15th.
After you have been accepted, we will provide you with preparatory readings.  The papers/statements are due June 28th.

For questions, please contact renee.vulto@ugent.be.

Preliminary programme
Thursday, 12 September
10:00 – 10:30 arrival and welcome
10:30 – 11:30 lecture 1
11:30 – 12:30 discussion
12:30 – 13:30 lunch
13:30 – 14:30 lecture 2
14:30 – 15:30 discussion
15:30 – 16:45 coffee
15:45 – 18:00 presentations and discussion

Friday, 13 September
09:00 – 10:00 lecture 3
10:00 – 11:00 discussion
11:00 – 11:15 coffee
11:15 – 13:00 presentations and discussion
13:00 – 14:00 lunch
14:00 – 16:00 presentations and discussion
16:00 – 16:15 coffee
16:15 – 16:45 closing statements

Representations of Violence and the Eye of the Beholder (1600-today)

imagebig.php.png

GEMS’s own Kornee van der Haven and Yannice De Bruyn, in cooperation with Karel Vanhaesebrouck (ULB/VUB/RITCS), organise the specialist course ‘Representations of Violence and the Eye of the Beholder (1600-today)’. Enabled by the Doctoral Schools, this specialist course will take place on 28 and 29 March 2019. Its focus is on how violence is represented in works of art from 1600 onwards; what it means to look at violence; and social, cultural and ethical questions concerning the representation of (extreme) violence today and during various historical periods.

This specialist course is intended for PhD students at both academic and artistic institutions, and artists. It intends to create an intense dialogue between researchers and artists, and focuses on a close interaction with art works from today and historic periods alike. Parallel to the specialist course, an exhibition will be shown in the Vandenhove Paviljoen in Ghent. A visit to the exhibition and dialogue with some of the participating artists is part of the specialist course.

More information can be found here. For more information and registration, please contact Yannice De Bruyn.

The image is from Simon Pummell’s ATLAS FOR INANIMATE BODIES.

doctoralschoolsprofiel_hq_rgb_web.png   logo_flanders+richtingmorgen.png

International Conference: “Coordinating the Two Books”

2BOOKS Poster DEF

This conference examines the configuration of confessional interests and epistemic concerns at the interface of hermeneutics and science. Current historiography does not appreciate early modern Catholic endeavours in generating knowledge about the Book of Nature and the Word of God in their own right. At best, they tend to be regarded as a stepping stone to the ‘real thing’, the Protestant study of nature as an act of devotion to God. It is high time to re-integrate early modern Catholic intellectual output in the received history of ways of managing religious and natural knowledge. This conference aims to contribute to studying Catholic’s proper trajectory in aligning natural enquiry and textual authority.

Programme

22 Nov.
9h00 all welcome at KANTL
(Koningstraat 18, Ghent)
9h15 Steven Vanden Broecke
‘Introduction’
9h30 Dario Tessicini
‘The Comet and the Plague:
Catholic Astrology, Meteorology and Medicine in Early Modern Venice’
10h00 Steve Matthews
‘The Jesuits, Biblical Hermeneutics, and the Scientific Revolution’
10h30 discussion
11h00 coffee break
11h30 Jonathan Regier
‘On Providence and Natural Cause:
Reading Cardano with the Roman Inquisition’
12h00 Anthony Ossa Richardson
‘Mersenne’s Two Books’
12h30 discussion
13h00 lunch
14h30 Eric Jorink
‘Reading the Book of Nature with Cartesian Glasses:
the Cases of Johannes Swammerdam and Nicolaus Steno’
15h00 Thomas Leinkauf
‘The “Book of Nature” and strategies of persuasion’
15h30 discussion
16h00 coffee break
16h30 KEY-NOTE:
Bernd Roling
‘Return From the Dead:
The Raising of Lazarus in Early Modern Biblical Commentaries and Natural Philosophy’
19h00 dinner
23 Nov.
9h00 all welcome at Sint-Baafshuis
(Biezekapelstraat 2, Ghent)
9h30 Jetze Touber
‘Slime of the Earth:
Biblical Contours of the Human Body as Microcosm in the Early 17th century’
10h00 Sietske Fransen
‘The Role of Catholicism in the Lives and Works of Father and Son Van Helmont’
10h30 discussion
11h00 coffee break
11h30 Steven Vanden Broecke
‘Belief, Piety and Erudition in Low Countries Baroque Science:
The Case of Govaert Wendelen (1580-1667)’
12h00 Florence Hsia
‘Biblical History and the Challenge of Chinese Astronomy’
12h30 discussion
14h00 lunch
14h30 Elena Rapetti
‘Reason in the limits of Faith:
Pierre-Daniel Huet, André Graindorge, and the making of science at the Académie de physique de Caen
15h00 Scott Mandelbrote
‘Newtonian philology:
Co-ordinating the two books in early eighteenth-century Europe’
15h30 discussion
16h00 coffee break
Jetze Touber
‘Concluding Discussion’

Organized by Jetze Touber and Steven Vanden Broecke (History Department, Ghent University), in conjunction with the IEMH.

To register, please contact Jetze Touber at jetze.touber@ugent.be.

I@H Digitizing Humanities lecture on Tudor Networks of Power

On Wednesday 7 November from 3-5pm, guest speaker Dr. Ruth Ahnert, Senior Lecturer at the Queen Mary University of London will give the second lecture of the I@H lecture series on Digitizing the Humanities: Tudor Networks of Power.

Location: Faculteitsbibliotheek in the Library Lab II Mangel Wing, Rozier 44.

Ahnert1.jpg

Dr. Ahnert’s research employs digital methods from the field of Complex Networks to study Tudor letters. By examining the structure of the social networks of sixteenth-century correspondents, she manages to recuperate the roles of people who tend to be ignored in more traditional historical research. A famous writer or politician might have caught the headlines with a book or argument, but it often took a range of facilitators to keep the message alive. Students will learn about network analysis and see that through this method, scholars of Humanities can gain insights into complex relational processes. The approach that Dr. Ahnert will discuss in her talk is applicable for literary studies – (re)mapping actors/characters, relations to explain power through texts.

This lecture is in English. Registration is required: https://webappsx.ugent.be/eventManager/events/IatHDHlecture. Andhttps://www.facebook.com/events/2219411448299891/.

The I@H Digitizing the Humanities lecture series is targeted to all students, and staff of UGent from bachelor and masters students, PhD candidates, researchers, professors, and support staff. The goal of the lecture series is to raise awareness of the state-of-the-art digital methods currently being used and developed by humanities scholars and empower researchers to put these to work themselves. With the financial support of I@H. Please see: https://www.ghentcdh.ugent.be/content/digitising-humanities-internationalisation-home-ih-lecture-series for more information.

International conference Law & order. The role of the institutions in creating the legislation in the Low Countries (1500­‐1700s)

law and order

The international conference Law & order. The role of the institutions in creating the legislation in the Low Countries (1500-1700) will take place in Brussels on Thursday, October 18th, 2018. Please find the PDF with additional information here. The conference is co-organised by GEMS member Annemieke Romein. It is a one-day workshop that aims at shedding light on a phenomenon that is crucial for the early modern period but has remained poorly studied. This day will unite researchers from both Belgium and the Netherlands.

 

PhD defense Delphine Calle

On Tuesday 21 August, GEMS member Delphine Calle will defend her doctoral thesis “Amour et applaudissements. La passion amoureuse, ses pièges et son succès dans les tragédies de Racine”. The defense starts at 1pm and will take place in Het Pand (room August Vermeylen). Please confirm your attendance to the reception afterwards (around 3pm) via this link.

Racine_-_Bérénice_Act5_sc7_1676_-_césar

Studying Past and Present Performances

On May 17th and 18th, professor Philip Auslander (Georgia Institute of Technology) was invited as a lecturer at the Doctoral Schools specialist course Studying Past and Present Performances. Find more information about it here. The course was organised and moderated by GEMS-member Kornee van der Haven and Katharina Pewny (THALIA), in cooperation with Tessa Vannieuwenhuyze (UGent/VUB), Sarah Adams (UGent) and Yannice De Bruyn (UGent). The participants to the course formed a very diverse group, whose research interests ranged from performance and theatre studies to conflict and development. At the initiative of Eun Kyoung Shin (UGent), the course was concluded with a group picture, that we are happy to share here. From left to right on the upper row: Kornee van der Haven, Katharina Pewny, Antia Díaz Otero (ULB), Lucas Trouillard (ULB), Kelsey Onderdijk (UGent), Sophie van den Berg (UGent), Sarah Adams, Jeroen Billiet (HoGent), Renée Vulto (UGent), Sreya Dutt (UGent), Tan Tan (Sun Weiwei) (UGent), Julian Kuttig (UGent). From left to right on the lower row: Eun Kyoung Shin, Caterina Mora (A.PASS), Yannice De Bruyn, Philip Auslander, Lieze Roels (UAntwerpen), Tessa Vannieuwenhuyze.

IMG-3011

GEMS Research Day 31 May: save the date!

On Thursday 31 May, GEMS will organise a research day. In the morning we will have a workshop for PhD students. In the afternoon there will be an interview with Kate Belsey about the state of scholarship in 2018, and a panel debate about publishing strategies.

More information will follow soon!

The Fame: Performance Art and Celebrity Culture. Lecture by Philip Auslander on May 16th

Because the number of seats is limited, we ask people who want to attend the lecture to register on the following email address: gems_ugent@yahoo.com.

GEMS, THALIA and the Doctoral School of Arts will be organizing a lecture with professor Dr. Philip Auslander, a renowned scholar in the field of media and performance studies. He will discuss performance art and its interconnection with the current surge of celebrity culture. Recent years have seen the incursion of the culture of celebrity into performance art, both in the sense that celebrities from other fields such as music and film are undertaking performance works, and in the sense that performance art has become a platform for the development of a celebrity identity, as in the case of Serbian artist Marina Abramović. In his lecture, professor Auslander will discuss the role of museums in promulgating celebrity and the antagonism toward them from art critics, as well as the structural similarities between the respective relationships between celebrities and their public, and performance artists and their audiences. These similarities can be organized around concepts of representation, originality and narrative, among others.

The lecture will take place on Wednesday 16th of May 2018 at 7pm.

Jozef Plateauzaal, entrance Plateaustraat 22, 9000 Ghent.

BIOGRAPHY

Professor Dr. Philip Auslander teaches at the school of Literature, Media and Communication Georgia Institute of Technology where he has been a professor since 1999. In the last decennia, he has published extensively in the field of performance studies, including two of his most influential books Performing Glam Rock: Gender and Theatricality in Popular Music (2006) and Liveness: Performance in a Mediatized Culture (2008). Currently he is preparing a new book that will be published in 2018 Reactivations: Essays on Performance and its Documentation.