PhD defense Delphine Calle

On Tuesday 21 August, GEMS member Delphine Calle will defend her doctoral thesis “Amour et applaudissements. La passion amoureuse, ses pièges et son succès dans les tragédies de Racine”. The defense starts at 1pm and will take place in Het Pand (room August Vermeylen). Please confirm your attendance to the reception afterwards (around 3pm) via this link.

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Studying Past and Present Performances

On May 17th and 18th, professor Philip Auslander (Georgia Institute of Technology) was invited as a lecturer at the Doctoral Schools specialist course Studying Past and Present Performances. Find more information about it here. The course was organised and moderated by GEMS-member Kornee van der Haven and Katharina Pewny (THALIA), in cooperation with Tessa Vannieuwenhuyze (UGent/VUB), Sarah Adams (UGent) and Yannice De Bruyn (UGent). The participants to the course formed a very diverse group, whose research interests ranged from performance and theatre studies to conflict and development. At the initiative of Eun Kyoung Shin (UGent), the course was concluded with a group picture, that we are happy to share here. From left to right on the upper row: Kornee van der Haven, Katharina Pewny, Antia Díaz Otero (ULB), Lucas Trouillard (ULB), Kelsey Onderdijk (UGent), Sophie van den Berg (UGent), Sarah Adams, Jeroen Billiet (HoGent), Renée Vulto (UGent), Sreya Dutt (UGent), Tan Tan (Sun Weiwei) (UGent), Julian Kuttig (UGent). From left to right on the lower row: Eun Kyoung Shin, Caterina Mora (A.PASS), Yannice De Bruyn, Philip Auslander, Lieze Roels (UAntwerpen), Tessa Vannieuwenhuyze.

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GEMS Research Day 31 May: save the date!

On Thursday 31 May, GEMS will organise a research day. In the morning we will have a workshop for PhD students. In the afternoon there will be an interview with Kate Belsey about the state of scholarship in 2018, and a panel debate about publishing strategies.

More information will follow soon!

The Fame: Performance Art and Celebrity Culture. Lecture by Philip Auslander on May 16th

Because the number of seats is limited, we ask people who want to attend the lecture to register on the following email address: gems_ugent@yahoo.com.

GEMS, THALIA and the Doctoral School of Arts will be organizing a lecture with professor Dr. Philip Auslander, a renowned scholar in the field of media and performance studies. He will discuss performance art and its interconnection with the current surge of celebrity culture. Recent years have seen the incursion of the culture of celebrity into performance art, both in the sense that celebrities from other fields such as music and film are undertaking performance works, and in the sense that performance art has become a platform for the development of a celebrity identity, as in the case of Serbian artist Marina Abramović. In his lecture, professor Auslander will discuss the role of museums in promulgating celebrity and the antagonism toward them from art critics, as well as the structural similarities between the respective relationships between celebrities and their public, and performance artists and their audiences. These similarities can be organized around concepts of representation, originality and narrative, among others.

The lecture will take place on Wednesday 16th of May 2018 at 7pm.

Jozef Plateauzaal, entrance Plateaustraat 22, 9000 Ghent.

BIOGRAPHY

Professor Dr. Philip Auslander teaches at the school of Literature, Media and Communication Georgia Institute of Technology where he has been a professor since 1999. In the last decennia, he has published extensively in the field of performance studies, including two of his most influential books Performing Glam Rock: Gender and Theatricality in Popular Music (2006) and Liveness: Performance in a Mediatized Culture (2008). Currently he is preparing a new book that will be published in 2018 Reactivations: Essays on Performance and its Documentation.

Exhibition Call for Justice, Art and Law in the Netherlands (1540-1650)

For the past few years, GEMS member Samuel Mareel has taken on the role of curator for the exhibition Call for Justice, Art and Law in the Netherlands (1540-1650). He worked together with Manfred Sellink and Elsje Janssen. The expo is held in the new museum Hof van Busleyden in Mechelen, a sixteenth-century Burgundian palace thScreen Shot 2018-04-19 at 12.35.35.pngat was restored recently for this purpose. Call for Justice is open from 23 March until 26 June 2018.

The exhibition highlights the rich and fascinating interaction between art, law and justice in the Netherlands from the 15th to the 17th century. In turbulent political and religious times, central institutions such as the Great Council of Mechelen gradually came to exercise more control over the legal process. While the administration of justice became more professional, it also became more unwieldy and less accessible. So it is no coincidence that justice and its administration feature as one of the most prominent themes in the art of the Low Countries in this period.

The exhibition builds on three central themes: justice, jurisprudence and injustice. You will discover prestigious masterpieces by artists such as Quentin Massys, Maarten van Heemskerck, Peter Brueghel the Elder, Maarten de Vos, Peter Paul Rubens, Antoon van Dyck and Philippe de Champaigne. Call for Justice examines the legal, historical and cultural context in which these works were created, gradually revealing one of the most universal human desires, namely the pursuit of justice and the complexity when it comes face-to-face with reality.

Some of the most prestigious museums in the world have loaned works for this exhibition. They include the Prado and the Patrimonio Nacional in Madrid, the Gemäldegalerie in Berlin, the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford as well as national and international private collections. Call for Justice is the closing event of the OP.RECHT.MECHELEN city festival.

https://www.oprechtmechelen.be/en/programma/call-justice
https://www.hofvanbusleyden.be/

Workshop theatre historiography

GEMS and THALIA would like to inform you of the following workshop, which is organised by members Kornee van der Haven, Sarah Adams and Yannice De Bruyn:

On 13 October 2017 we organize a workshop on theatre historiography in Amsterdam (UvA). Our primary aim is to offer PhD students working on historical theatre and performance a platform to discuss methodological difficulties they encounter in their research. It is a perfect occasion for peer discussion and feedback from more experienced scholars and dramaturgs. By means of introduction, Imre Bésanger (Theater Kwast) will outline his approach to methodology in his work with historical theatre texts. Kornee van der Haven (UGent) will moderate a discussion of Erika Fischer-Lichte’s views on theatre historiography.

Please find the (Dutch) program hereSarah Adams can provide you with more information and/or register your participation.

The image is a 3D visualisation of the Tapissiers theatre in Antwerp (1711) © Timothy De Paepe, 2007-2017.

 

CFP: Literature without Frontiers?

Next year (9-10 February, 2018) a conference will be organised at Ghent University  about perspectives for a transnational literary history of the Low Countries. This conference – Literature without Frontiers? – aims to bring together a number of telling examples that advocate a transnational perspective for the construction and writing of the literary history (histories?) of the Low Countries in the period 1200-1800. We invite scholars of the periods involved to address case studies (authors, texts, translations, mechanisms of textual production, motifs, tropes, genres) that on account of their ‘transnational’ character have fallen outside the scope of the current attempts of literary historiography.

Traditional literary historiography is rooted in the nineteenth-century construction of national literatures based on the political desire to demarcate national states and their corresponding linguistic identities from each other. For the study of the literature that predates the nineteenth-century nation-state the taxonomy of literary phenomena on the basis of geographical frontiers that were in most cases non-existent at the time, is a highly artificial though very common practice. The organizers of the conference Literature without Frontiers? believe that the study of literature in this long period is better served by a transnational perspective, if only because of the transnational character of its functioning. On account of their limiting focus, nationally oriented literary histories of the periods in question cannot but undervalue the actual cultural processes at work both in the international ‘Republic of Letters’ as well as in the language regions that exceed the borders of the current nation states.

Keynote speakers: Frans Blom (University of Amsterdam) and David Wallace (University of Pennsylvania)

Proposals for a thirty-minute presentation are expected by June 1st, 2017. For more details, see the CFP Literature without Frontiers.

Academic award for GEMS-member Sarah Adams

Title page Monzongo, of de koningklyke slaaf (Van Winter 1774). Slave Zambiza attacks commander Alvarado.

Title page Monzongo, of de koningklyke slaaf (Van Winter 1774). Slave Zambiza attacks commander Alvarado.

GEMS-member Sarah Adams is awarded the biennial prize of the Maatschappij der Nederlandse Letterkunde (Society of Dutch Literature) for the best master thesis on Dutch literature. Sarah examined the power of antislavery theatre in the Dutch abolitionist discussion around 1800 (supervisor: Kornee van der Haven). With this master dissertation, she graduated in Historical Linguistics and Literature at Ghent University (2015). Sarah is preparing a PhD-proposal on antislavery theatre in the Netherlands in the period of 1775-1825.

For the official notice: http://www.mijnedlet.nl/mdnl/?p=1174

 

March 24th, 2016: Lecture Jonathan Culler

Culler_BaudelairewithoutBenjaminIt is our pleasure to invite you to the lecture ‘Baudelaire without Benjamin’ that will be given by Professor. Dr. Jonathan Culler on Thursday March 24. The lecture will take place at Room Jozef-Plateau (Ghent University, building Plateau-Rozier), from 4 pm to 6 pm.

Jonathan Culler is Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cornell University. In 2015, his Theory of the Lyric was published, in which Culler offers us a bright, new and challenging view on the tradition of the lyric. Culler has also worked on 19th-century French literature (especially on Flaubert and Baudelaire), and on contemporary literary theory and criticism (especially structuralism, deconstruction and French theory generally). Other books that he has written are (amongst others): Flaubert: The Uses of Uncertainty (1974), Structuralist Poetics (1975), The Pursuit of Signs (1981), On Deconstruction (1982), Barthes (1983), and Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction (1997).

Jonathan Culler will be visiting our university as part of our doctoral seminar series: Histories and Theories of Reading. In the seminar he will be discussing his most recent book on the theory of the lyric next to his work on literary theory in general. The seminar is open to all PhD students. Information on attending the doctoral seminar or future seminars can be found here.

You are most cordially invited to attend the lecture. Please confirm your attendance by sending an email to britt.grootes@ugent.be. We look forward to seeing you at the lecture.