Workshop theatre historiography

GEMS and THALIA would like to inform you of the following workshop, which is organised by members Kornee van der Haven, Sarah Adams and Yannice De Bruyn:

On 13 October 2017 we organize a workshop on theatre historiography in Amsterdam (UvA). Our primary aim is to offer PhD students working on historical theatre and performance a platform to discuss methodological difficulties they encounter in their research. It is a perfect occasion for peer discussion and feedback from more experienced scholars and dramaturgs. By means of introduction, Imre Bésanger (Theater Kwast) will outline his approach to methodology in his work with historical theatre texts. Kornee van der Haven (UGent) will moderate a discussion of Erika Fischer-Lichte’s views on theatre historiography.

Please find the (Dutch) program hereSarah Adams can provide you with more information and/or register your participation.

The image is a 3D visualisation of the Tapissiers theatre in Antwerp (1711) © Timothy De Paepe, 2007-2017.

 

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CFP: Literature without Frontiers?

Next year (9-10 February, 2018) a conference will be organised at Ghent University  about perspectives for a transnational literary history of the Low Countries. This conference – Literature without Frontiers? – aims to bring together a number of telling examples that advocate a transnational perspective for the construction and writing of the literary history (histories?) of the Low Countries in the period 1200-1800. We invite scholars of the periods involved to address case studies (authors, texts, translations, mechanisms of textual production, motifs, tropes, genres) that on account of their ‘transnational’ character have fallen outside the scope of the current attempts of literary historiography.

Traditional literary historiography is rooted in the nineteenth-century construction of national literatures based on the political desire to demarcate national states and their corresponding linguistic identities from each other. For the study of the literature that predates the nineteenth-century nation-state the taxonomy of literary phenomena on the basis of geographical frontiers that were in most cases non-existent at the time, is a highly artificial though very common practice. The organizers of the conference Literature without Frontiers? believe that the study of literature in this long period is better served by a transnational perspective, if only because of the transnational character of its functioning. On account of their limiting focus, nationally oriented literary histories of the periods in question cannot but undervalue the actual cultural processes at work both in the international ‘Republic of Letters’ as well as in the language regions that exceed the borders of the current nation states.

Keynote speakers: Frans Blom (University of Amsterdam) and David Wallace (University of Pennsylvania)

Proposals for a thirty-minute presentation are expected by June 1st, 2017. For more details, see the CFP Literature without Frontiers.

Academic award for GEMS-member Sarah Adams

Title page Monzongo, of de koningklyke slaaf (Van Winter 1774). Slave Zambiza attacks commander Alvarado.

Title page Monzongo, of de koningklyke slaaf (Van Winter 1774). Slave Zambiza attacks commander Alvarado.

GEMS-member Sarah Adams is awarded the biennial prize of the Maatschappij der Nederlandse Letterkunde (Society of Dutch Literature) for the best master thesis on Dutch literature. Sarah examined the power of antislavery theatre in the Dutch abolitionist discussion around 1800 (supervisor: Kornee van der Haven). With this master dissertation, she graduated in Historical Linguistics and Literature at Ghent University (2015). Sarah is preparing a PhD-proposal on antislavery theatre in the Netherlands in the period of 1775-1825.

For the official notice: http://www.mijnedlet.nl/mdnl/?p=1174

 

March 24th, 2016: Lecture Jonathan Culler

Culler_BaudelairewithoutBenjaminIt is our pleasure to invite you to the lecture ‘Baudelaire without Benjamin’ that will be given by Professor. Dr. Jonathan Culler on Thursday March 24. The lecture will take place at Room Jozef-Plateau (Ghent University, building Plateau-Rozier), from 4 pm to 6 pm.

Jonathan Culler is Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cornell University. In 2015, his Theory of the Lyric was published, in which Culler offers us a bright, new and challenging view on the tradition of the lyric. Culler has also worked on 19th-century French literature (especially on Flaubert and Baudelaire), and on contemporary literary theory and criticism (especially structuralism, deconstruction and French theory generally). Other books that he has written are (amongst others): Flaubert: The Uses of Uncertainty (1974), Structuralist Poetics (1975), The Pursuit of Signs (1981), On Deconstruction (1982), Barthes (1983), and Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction (1997).

Jonathan Culler will be visiting our university as part of our doctoral seminar series: Histories and Theories of Reading. In the seminar he will be discussing his most recent book on the theory of the lyric next to his work on literary theory in general. The seminar is open to all PhD students. Information on attending the doctoral seminar or future seminars can be found here.

You are most cordially invited to attend the lecture. Please confirm your attendance by sending an email to britt.grootes@ugent.be. We look forward to seeing you at the lecture.

 

February 26th: PhD Defence

Britt Dams will publicly defend her PhD thesis “Comprehending the New World in the Early Modern Period: Descriptions of Dutch Brazil (1624-1654)” on friday February 26 at 4PM, in auditorium A at Henri Dunantlaan 1 (Ghent).

Scenes, scenes, scenes

This year marks the occasion of the fourth centenary of William Shakespeare’s death. The event will be celebrated throughout the Anglophone world. As a tribute to Shakespeare’s lasting presence in the contemporary theatre of Flanders and the Netherlands, Jozef De Vos, Jürgen Pieters and Laurens De Vos have written Shakespeare, auteur voor alle seizoenen, to be published with Lannoo in the course of the Bard’s birthday month (book presentation on April 19, more details to follow soon).
On www.shakescenes.ugent.be Jürgen Pieters will publish a series of analyses (in Dutch) of famous scenes taken from Shakespeare’s plays. Every month, on or around the 23d, a new instalment of the series will become available online. The February-instalment, on Hamlet, can be read here.

October 12th: Lecture Martin Eisner

It is our pleasure to invite you to a lecture on “Dante and the Afterlife of the Book: The Philology of World Literature” that will be given on Monday, 12 October by Prof. Dr. Martin Eisner (Duke University). The lecture will take place in the Large Meeting Room of the English Section (Blandijn, third floor) from 11 am to 1 pm. After the lecture we will be offering sandwiches.

Danteslibrary
Prof. Eisner has published on medieval Italian literature, as well as the history of the book and media. He will talk about his new book on Dante and the material tradition of Dante’s first book, the Vita Nuova, from its earliest manuscripts to the most recent editions and adaptations. He will also discuss his ongoing Dante’s Library digital humanities project which tries to reconsider what Dante’s books and manuscripts might tell us about how Dante read, what materials he might have encountered and how these materials might have influenced his reading practice.

We most cordially invite you to attend his lecture. Please confirm your attendance before Friday 9 October by sending an email to Katrien Declercq indicating whether you would like us to provide sandwiches or not.

October 6th & 13th: DS seminar with Martin Eisner

EisnerOur first guest of the Doctoral Course Histories and Theories of Reading is Martin Eisner (Duke University), who will be talking about his research on the works of Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio, authorship of the vernacular, and the history of the book and media. His new project is on Dante and the afterlife of the book in which he joins material philology with intellectual history. He will also discuss his ongoing Dante’s Library digital humanities project which tries to reconsider what Dante’s books might tell us about how Dante read, what materials he might have encountered and how these materials might have influenced his reading practice.

Programme:

Tuesday, 6 October, 2015, 9:30 am – Faculty of Arts & Philosophy Library ‘Zaal Mortier’: preparatory session.

Tuesday, 13 October, 2015, 9:30 am – Faculty of Arts & Philosophy Library ‘Zaal Mortier’: session with Martin Eisner.

Registration for the specialist course is required. See here or here for more information on registration and on the entire course.