In the picture: Brandt’s De Veinzende Torquatus (1645), Providentially Assigned Stadtholders and the Politics of Rational Deception by Tom Laureys

GEMS researchers are frequently publishing new articles, books, book chapters, edited volumes and blogs. In ‘in the picture’ we put a spotlight on a recent publication of one of our members.

Tom Laureys, “‘I, Who Used to Serve as Jupiter’s Lightning on Earth’: Geeraerdt Brandt’s De Veinzende Torquatus (1645), Providentially Assigned Stadtholders and the Politics of Rational Deception” in Dutch Crossing. Journal of Low Countries Studies (2019).

In this article, I show that Geeraerdt Brandt’s popular Dutch revenge tragedy De veinzende Torquatus (‘The feigning Torquatus’, 1645) engages with the political debates concerning the rightful succession of monarchs based on primogeniture, and – be it in a grotesque, even parodic way – the Calvinistic belief that the Dutch stadtholders were God’s providential instruments, assigned to guide His chosen people. Moreover, I show that the play offers a confrontation between two conflicting conceptions of power. The play’s eponymous protagonist holds what I call an intellectual (idealistic) conception of power, in which man’s rational faculty, including his capacity for rational deception, is all-decisive. This vision, though, clashes with the more physical (materialistic) conceptualization of power which Torquatus’s antagonist Noron upholds. I’m pretty proud about this publication, since it is my first A1 article and the manuscript was accepted by the reviewers without further remarks. The review process took about five months, but I was astonished by the speed with which the actual production took place. Within a couple of days, the article was available online. Soon it will be allocated to a specific issue in print.

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In the picture: “Enhancing the Research on Sophistry in the Renaissance” by Teodoro Katinis

GEMS researchers are frequently publishing new articles, books, book chapters, edited volumes and blogs. In ‘in the picture’ we put a spotlight on a recent publication of one of our members.

Teodoro Katinis, “Enhancing the Research on Sophistry in the Renaissance” in T. Katinis (ed.), The Sophistic Renaissance: Authors, Texts, Interpretations, in Philosophical Readings XI.2 (2019), special issue, 58-62.

“My contribution introduces the first collection of essays ever published on the legacy of ancient sophists in the Latin and vernacular Renaissance, and considers possible research developments in the field over the next years. This collection is the final result of a conference held at Ca’ Foscari University (Venice 2016) that I organized at the end of my Marie Curie fellowship to gather international experts to discuss a very understudied subject: the rebirth of sophistry in early modern Europe. This Philosophical Readings special issue, which is an open-access online publication, can interest scholars and students from several fields, including intellectual history, classical reception studies, neo-Latin and romance languages literature, and history of philosophy, among others. I hope this work  will encourage young researches and colleagues to further the investigation of the fascinating way in which the ‘villains’ of the ancient culture (according to Plato and Aristotle) became a subject of debate and fundamental reference from 15th to 17th-century to discuss skepticism, relativism and the power of rhetoric.” 

Research Day – GEMS

Date: Wednesday, 29 May 2019

Location: Simon Stevin Room (morning) and Jozef Plateau Room (afternoon). Jozef-Plateaustraat 22, 9000 Gent

On 29 May, GEMS will organize its second Research Day. During that day, we will discuss together some topical questions concerning European research agendas, applications and international cooperation between research groups, wit special attention for European projects and networks in the field of early modern studies. Anyone who is interested in these issues is invited to take part in the morning and/or afternoon program of this research day, with a presentation by Bram Van Oostveldt about his ERC-project application in the morning and three sessions in the afternoon, two about ERC applications and projects and one about international research collaborations and networks.

PLEASE REGISTER for this research day by conforming your attendance to: gems_ugent@yahoo.com . Please indicate in your message if you would like to take part in the morning program, the afternoon program, or both, and if you would like to join us for lunch.

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GEMS in portraits: Annemieke Romein

If there is someone who is not afraid to cross geographical and disciplinary borders, it’s Annemieke Romein, whose research on legislation texts in the seventeenth century has not only brought her from the Netherlands to Ghent, it also took her to Germany, Switzerland, and from the archives to the digital humanities. Annemieke completed her studies and PhD at Erasmus University Rotterdam and is currently a NWO Rubicon-fellow working at the UGhent Department of History. Additionally, she is Researcher-in-Residence at the National Library (KB) in The Hague working with digital humanities methods to improve the searchability of early modern legislation texts. Over a coffee in the Vooruit, we discussed how vital it is to conduct comparative research, and how energizing interdisciplinary work can be.

Handwritten ‘vorstelijke ordonnantie’ from Flanders ca. 1619 (RAG_GW8_RvV_772)
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Dürer ©: Selections from The Sunaert Collection

Temporary exhibition (10 May 2019 – 22 June 2019)
Opening: Thursday May 9th, 6 p.m. – 7.30 p.m.

Location: VANDENHOVE – Centre for Architecture and Art, UGent. Address: Rozier 1, 9000 Gent.

Opening hours: Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. – 6 p.m.

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(english version below)

“Dürer ©: Selecties uit de Sunaert Collection” presenteert houtsneden en gravures van en naar Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528), geschonken door de Belgische schilder en verzamelaar Adolf Pieter Sunaert (1825-1876) aan de Universiteitsbibliotheek van de UGent. Deze prenten, die sinds de schenking aan het einde van de negentiende eeuw nooit werden tentoongesteld, waren fascinerend voor zowel de tijdgenoten van Dürer als voor latere generaties van drukkers.
De tentoonstelling verkent de dynamische relaties tussen originelen, kopieën en artistieke interpretaties in de prentkunst van de Renaissance, en de complexe problematiek van auteurschap en authenticiteit in de vroegmoderne Europese cultuur.

De tentoonstelling is samengesteld door Noam Andrews in samenwerking met studenten van het graduate seminar Iconology (lente 2019), van de Vakgroep Kunst-, Muziek- en Theaterwetenschappen van de UGent.

Zie de link voor meer informatie over het UGent Centrum voor architectuur en kunst.

 


“Dürer ©: Selections from The Sunaert Collection” presents woodcuts and engravings by and after Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528) originally belonging to the Belgian painter and collector Adolf Pieter Sunaert (1825-1876). Never exhibited since their donation to the University Library Ghent in the late nineteenth century, these prints were objects of fascination both for Dürer’s contemporaries and the following generations of print artists.
Through an exploration of the dynamic relations between origins, copies, and artistic interpretation that animated Renaissance print culture, the exhibition addresses the manifold construction of authorship and authenticity in early modern Europe.

Conceived and realized by dr. Noam Andrews in tandem with students from the graduate seminar Iconology (Spring 2019), Vakgroep Kunst-, Muziek-, en Theaterwetenschappen, Universiteit Gent.

 

More information about the UGent Centre for Architecture and Art at this link.

Exhibition Baroque Brutalities: Imagining Violence in Art (17th Century & today)

VANDENHOVE Centre for Architecture and Arts, Rozier 1, Ghent

Thursday & Friday 28 & 29 March, 2-6 PM and Saturday 30 March, 10 AM – 5 PM.

The exhibition shows 17th-century prints from the UGent University Library and works by Simon Pummell (video), Doina Kraal and Kevin Simón Mancera Vivas (peep-show box), Abattoir Fermé (performance stills).

Poster Inger Leemans Imagineering Violence 2019 Amsterdam-02

 The early modern period witnessed a true explosion of images on pain, suffering and violence across painting, print, theater, and public space. The public had plenty to choose from: sieges, executions, massacres. Violence fascinated the early modern spectator, yet it simultaneously conjured up numerous questions, some of which are not unlike those posed today.

How can violence be represented and imagined? How can an artist document the violence of the times? What about the numerous ethical implications? When does a spectator become a voyeur? When does violence turn into spectacle? Can violence be aestheticized? Does an artist have a duty to document contemporary violence? These questions saturate modern art, from the horrors of War in Goya to the racial violence in Edward and Nancy Kienholz’s ‘Five Car Stud’.

Baroque Brutalities not only shows how violence is represented in works of art from about 1650, but it also deals with the above-mentioned social, cultural and ethical questions concerning the representation of (extreme) violence today and in the Baroque era.

This exhibition is an initiative of the Dutch-Belgian research group ITEMP: Imagineering Violence – see: https://itempviolence.wordpress.com.

Workshop Performance Historiography: Examining Past Performances from a Present-day Perspective (12 & 13 September 2019)

The application deadline has passed and a selection of participants has been made. For any inquiries, please contact renee.vulto@ugent.be.

With Henry Turner (Rutgers University) and Morag Josephine Grant (University of Edinburgh) (keynote speakers), Jane Hwang Degenhardt (University of Massachusetts Amherst), and Cornelis van der Haven (Ghent University).

Workshop for early career researchers on the theme of performance historiography,  organised by the interdisciplinary research groups THALIA (Ghent University and Free University of Brussels) and GEMS (Ghent University). The workshop aims to approach this theme from an interdisciplinary perspective, and to facilitate dialogue between young researchers and experts.

The workshop departs from the following: the existing body of literature on historical performance (1600-1900) is rather anecdotal and tends to focus on written sources rather than examining past performances as experiences, or as events that had a bodily or an emotional impact. In the workshop, we intend to explore how contemporary theory can help us accessing past performances, and understand their function in their historical time and space. Examples of such performances are theatrical performances, music performances, rituals, religious processions, or political demonstrations, but also broader notions performance are welcome to be discussed.

During the two days, Henry Turner, Jane Davidson and Morag Josephine Grant will each give a lecture in which they discuss performance historiography from their area of expertise. The rest of the time is designated for research presentations by the participants and discussion.

(Unfortunately, Jane Davidson will not be able to participate due to other obligations. Jane Hwang Degenhardt and Kornee van der Haven, will contribute to the discussions from their expertises in the field of historical performance and culture.)

Preliminary programme
Thursday, 12 September
10:00 – 10:30 arrival and welcome
10:30 – 11:30 lecture 1
11:30 – 12:30 discussion
12:30 – 13:30 lunch
13:30 – 14:30 lecture 2
14:30 – 15:30 discussion
15:30 – 16:45 coffee
15:45 – 18:00 presentations and discussion

Friday, 13 September
09:00 – 11:00 discussion
11:00 – 11:15 coffee
11:15 – 13:00 presentations and discussion
13:00 – 14:00 lunch
14:00 – 16:00 presentations and discussion
16:00 – 16:15 coffee
16:15 – 16:45 closing statements

Representations of Violence and the Eye of the Beholder (1600-today)

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GEMS’s own Kornee van der Haven and Yannice De Bruyn, in cooperation with Karel Vanhaesebrouck (ULB/VUB/RITCS), organise the specialist course ‘Representations of Violence and the Eye of the Beholder (1600-today)’. Enabled by the Doctoral Schools, this specialist course will take place on 28 and 29 March 2019. Its focus is on how violence is represented in works of art from 1600 onwards; what it means to look at violence; and social, cultural and ethical questions concerning the representation of (extreme) violence today and during various historical periods.

This specialist course is intended for PhD students at both academic and artistic institutions, and artists. It intends to create an intense dialogue between researchers and artists, and focuses on a close interaction with art works from today and historic periods alike. Parallel to the specialist course, an exhibition will be shown in the Vandenhove Paviljoen in Ghent. A visit to the exhibition and dialogue with some of the participating artists is part of the specialist course.

More information can be found here. For more information and registration, please contact Yannice De Bruyn.

The image is from Simon Pummell’s ATLAS FOR INANIMATE BODIES.

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International Conference: “Coordinating the Two Books”

2BOOKS Poster DEF

This conference examines the configuration of confessional interests and epistemic concerns at the interface of hermeneutics and science. Current historiography does not appreciate early modern Catholic endeavours in generating knowledge about the Book of Nature and the Word of God in their own right. At best, they tend to be regarded as a stepping stone to the ‘real thing’, the Protestant study of nature as an act of devotion to God. It is high time to re-integrate early modern Catholic intellectual output in the received history of ways of managing religious and natural knowledge. This conference aims to contribute to studying Catholic’s proper trajectory in aligning natural enquiry and textual authority.

Programme

22 Nov.
9h00 all welcome at KANTL
(Koningstraat 18, Ghent)
9h15 Steven Vanden Broecke
‘Introduction’
9h30 Dario Tessicini
‘The Comet and the Plague:
Catholic Astrology, Meteorology and Medicine in Early Modern Venice’
10h00 Steve Matthews
‘The Jesuits, Biblical Hermeneutics, and the Scientific Revolution’
10h30 discussion
11h00 coffee break
11h30 Jonathan Regier
‘On Providence and Natural Cause:
Reading Cardano with the Roman Inquisition’
12h00 Anthony Ossa Richardson
‘Mersenne’s Two Books’
12h30 discussion
13h00 lunch
14h30 Eric Jorink
‘Reading the Book of Nature with Cartesian Glasses:
the Cases of Johannes Swammerdam and Nicolaus Steno’
15h00 Thomas Leinkauf
‘The “Book of Nature” and strategies of persuasion’
15h30 discussion
16h00 coffee break
16h30 KEY-NOTE:
Bernd Roling
‘Return From the Dead:
The Raising of Lazarus in Early Modern Biblical Commentaries and Natural Philosophy’
19h00 dinner
23 Nov.
9h00 all welcome at Sint-Baafshuis
(Biezekapelstraat 2, Ghent)
9h30 Jetze Touber
‘Slime of the Earth:
Biblical Contours of the Human Body as Microcosm in the Early 17th century’
10h00 Sietske Fransen
‘The Role of Catholicism in the Lives and Works of Father and Son Van Helmont’
10h30 discussion
11h00 coffee break
11h30 Steven Vanden Broecke
‘Belief, Piety and Erudition in Low Countries Baroque Science:
The Case of Govaert Wendelen (1580-1667)’
12h00 Florence Hsia
‘Biblical History and the Challenge of Chinese Astronomy’
12h30 discussion
14h00 lunch
14h30 Elena Rapetti
‘Reason in the limits of Faith:
Pierre-Daniel Huet, André Graindorge, and the making of science at the Académie de physique de Caen
15h00 Scott Mandelbrote
‘Newtonian philology:
Co-ordinating the two books in early eighteenth-century Europe’
15h30 discussion
16h00 coffee break
Jetze Touber
‘Concluding Discussion’

Organized by Jetze Touber and Steven Vanden Broecke (History Department, Ghent University), in conjunction with the IEMH.

To register, please contact Jetze Touber at jetze.touber@ugent.be.

I@H Digitizing Humanities lecture on Tudor Networks of Power

On Wednesday 7 November from 3-5pm, guest speaker Dr. Ruth Ahnert, Senior Lecturer at the Queen Mary University of London will give the second lecture of the I@H lecture series on Digitizing the Humanities: Tudor Networks of Power.

Location: Faculteitsbibliotheek in the Library Lab II Mangel Wing, Rozier 44.

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Dr. Ahnert’s research employs digital methods from the field of Complex Networks to study Tudor letters. By examining the structure of the social networks of sixteenth-century correspondents, she manages to recuperate the roles of people who tend to be ignored in more traditional historical research. A famous writer or politician might have caught the headlines with a book or argument, but it often took a range of facilitators to keep the message alive. Students will learn about network analysis and see that through this method, scholars of Humanities can gain insights into complex relational processes. The approach that Dr. Ahnert will discuss in her talk is applicable for literary studies – (re)mapping actors/characters, relations to explain power through texts.

This lecture is in English. Registration is required: https://webappsx.ugent.be/eventManager/events/IatHDHlecture. Andhttps://www.facebook.com/events/2219411448299891/.

The I@H Digitizing the Humanities lecture series is targeted to all students, and staff of UGent from bachelor and masters students, PhD candidates, researchers, professors, and support staff. The goal of the lecture series is to raise awareness of the state-of-the-art digital methods currently being used and developed by humanities scholars and empower researchers to put these to work themselves. With the financial support of I@H. Please see: https://www.ghentcdh.ugent.be/content/digitising-humanities-internationalisation-home-ih-lecture-series for more information.