GEMS Seminar: Atelier with with Renée Vulto and Fabio della Schiava (25 January, 10-12 AM)

Thursday, 25 January, 10-12 AM, Faculty Library Arts and Philosophy, Magnel wing, Room “Freddy Mortier”.

Fabio della Schiava (UGent / KU Leuven): Toward a critical edition of Biondo Flavio’s Roma instaurata. 

Published in 1446 by Biondo Flavio, one of the most distinguished historians of the Italian Quattrocento, Roma instaurata is an account in Latin of the archeological remains of ancient and christian Rome. Because of its centrality both for scholars of Humanism and Archeology, Roma instaurata has been repeatedly published between the Fifteenth and the Twenty-first century but still lacks a critical edition able to provide the reader with a reliable text and a better knowledge of Biondo’s antiquarian methodology. This edition has been now partially accomplished thanks to a 3 years project sponsored by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and undertaken at Bonn University. The paper aims to share the results of this research with a focus on the philological problems which have been encountered and the applied methodology to solve them.

Renée Vulto (UGent): Singing Communities – Dutch political songs and the performance of national identity (1775-1825)

This PhD project investigates how songs can have contributed to the development of a national consciousness in the Northern Netherlands in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. At this time, national thinking just began to develop and was particularly hard to define in a culturally fragmented region like the Netherlands that went through severe economic, political and social crisis. Songs were in Early Modern discourse seen as effective tools to strengthen the formation of collective identities. Therefore, they are in this research not considered as mere textual and musical representations of an ideology, but as scripts for performance that produce collective identification. The focus is on the possible tensions between songs as attempts to create feelings of national belonging and unity on the one hand, and the realization of these aims in the harsh reality of political and social instability.

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GEMS-Seminars

The GEMS Seminars provide the opportunity to members of our research group and other scholars with an interest in the early modern period to meet and discuss current research issues. In the schedule on our website (gemsugent.wordpress.com) you will find two categories of these meetings. First there are the Ateliers during which GEMS-members or guests present their research projects, recent publications or ideas for future projects. Who is interested to spotlight his or her current or future research projects during one of these meetings are cordially invited to get in contact with the organization (cornelis.vanderhaven@ugent.be). Secondly we will have two meetings with specialists of the early modern period who will introduce to you the work of a famous scholar by whom they are inspired in their own scholarly work (Inspired by…). GEMS-members do not need to register for the seminars. Colleagues with an interest in the early modern period who are not a member of GEMS can join us too (after a short notice to: cornelis.vanderhaven@ugent.be, because of the limited space in the reserved rooms).

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Announcement: GEMS Seminar: Histories and Theories of Reading. Fourth Series.

In the course of 2018, GEMS will host a number of international scholars whose work is relevant for the study of literary and other cultural artefacts and practices of the early modern period. Neema Parvini, David Marno, Zachary Schiffman, Marisa Galvez, Frans-Willem Korsten and Catherine Belsey have all accepted our invitation to participate in a series of discussions with PhD-students. The Seminar is co-funded by Ghent University’s Doctoral School of Arts, Humanities and Law.

In the course of the past years, the program of the Histories and Theories of Reading Seminar has featured, among others, Kathy Eden, Albert Ascoli, Roland Greene, Jonathan Culler, William Marx, Leah Price, Julian Wolfreys and Rodolphe Gasché.

More details about this year’s programme will be announced in the course of January 2018. The first three sessions will take place between March and June, the other three between October and December. PhD-students who want to participate in the Seminar and obtain credits for the DS-programme are required to inscribe for three out of six sessions. Expressions of interest and further inquiries can be sent to jurgen.pieters@ugent.be.

The picture is Antonello da Messina’s Saint Jerome in His Library (ca. 1475).

GEMS in portraits: Youri Desplenter

IMGP0085.jpgFor our autumn interview, GEMS had the chance to talk with Youri Desplenter. Although in fact a medievalist, he is closely involved with GEMS because of the intricate connection between the two periods. Youri’s specialty is Middle Dutch religious and moral-didactic literature, and the relation between vernacular and Latin literature in the Middle Ages. After finishing his dissertation on the translations of Latin hymns and sequences, he did a postdoctoral research on the translations of the Psalms, and on the writings of Jan van Leeuwen († 1378). As a professor of Dutch medieval literature, Youri is also a popular teacher.

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GEMS Seminar: Teodoro Katinis inspired by… Robert Klein

Wednesday, December 6th, 2-4 PM, Faculty Library Arts & Philosophy, Magnel-wing, Room ‘Freddy Mortier’

As Henri Zerner wrote in his introduction to Robert Klein’s collection of essays, “his real province as a scholar was that area where art, literature, and scientific or parascentific discourse meet with philosophy. He, if anyone, was a historian of ideas.”

During this GEMS seminar, Teodoro Katinis will present Robert Klein (1918-67), his work, and his unique approach to the cultural phenomena of the Italian Renaissance and beyond. We will examine Klein’s methodology by reading one of his most inspiring essay, L’imagination comme vêtement de l’âme chez Marsile Ficin et Giordano Bruno, in which he combines in a most original way his analysis of the sources with his own interpretation of the Renaissance.

Discussing some of his research outcomes, Katinis will show how Klein’s research topics and method can be inspiring for scholars from different fields.

For literary scholars, historians, philosophers and scholars interested in the Renaissance culture. For registration, please contact Kornee van der Haven: cornelis.vanderhaven@ugent.be

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The GEMS Seminars provide the opportunity to members of our research group and other scholars with an interest in the early modern period to meet and discuss current research issues. In the schedule on our website (gemsugent.wordpress.com) you will find two categories of these meetings. First there are the Ateliers during which GEMS-members or guests present their research projects, recent publications or ideas for future projects. Who is interested to spotlight his or her current or future research projects during one of these meetings are cordially invited to get in contact with the organization (cornelis.vanderhaven@ugent.be). Secondly we will have two meetings with specialists of the early modern period who will introduce to you the work of a famous scholar by whom they are inspired in their own scholarly work (Inspired by…). Colleagues with an interest in the early modern period who are not a member of GEMS can join us too (after a short notice to: cornelis.vanderhaven@ugent.be, because of the limited space in the reservated rooms).

Audio recording of the Atelier with Frans-Willem Korsten (2017-10-20)

 

On October 20th, Frans-Willem Korsten was invited by GEMS to present his upcoming book, A Dutch Republican Baroque. In an interview by Jürgen Pieters, the author discussed some of the key issues raised in his thought-provoking book, after which the audience was invited to join the discussion. If you click here, you will be redirected to an audio recording of the entire Atelier (1.30h). Around the end, Frans-Willem showed a small fragment of one of Maradona’s famous goals to illustrate his understanding of the concept ‘dramatic moment.’

 

GEMS Seminar: Atelier with Frans-Willem Korsten (Leiden University)

Friday 20 October, 3-5 PM, 110.028 (Blandijnberg 2, Gent)

During this Atelier, Frans-Willem Korsten will present his new book A Dutch Republican Baroque (Amsterdam UP). After a short introduction about this new publication and how it came into being, the author will be interviewed by Jürgen Pieters, to discuss some of the key issues raised in his thought-provoking book, after which the audience will be invited to join the discussion.

In his book, Frans-Willem Korsten shows how in Baroque forms of art of the Dutch Republic, two aesthetic formal modes, theatre and drama, were dynamically related to two political concepts, event and moment. The Dutch version of the Baroque is characterised by a fascination with this world regarded as one possibility out of a plurality of potential worlds. It is this fascination that explains the coincidence in the Dutch Republic, strange at first sight, of Baroque exuberance, irregularity, paradox, and vertigo with scientific rigor, regularity, mathematical logic, and rational distance. In giving a new historical perspective on the Baroque as a specifically Dutch republican one, this study also offers a new and systematic approach towards the interactions among the notions of theatricality, dramatisation, moment, and event: concepts that are currently at the centre of philosophical and political debates but the modern articulation of which can best be considered in the explorations of history and world in the Dutch Republic.

GEMS-Seminars
The GEMS Seminars provide the opportunity to members of our research group and other scholars with an interest in the early modern period to meet and discuss current research issues. In the schedule on our website (gemsugent.wordpress.com) you will find two categories of these meetings. First there are the Ateliers during which GEMS-members or guests present their research projects, recent publications or ideas for future projects. Who is interested to spotlight his or her current or future research projects during one of these meetings are cordially invited to get in contact with the organization (cornelis.vanderhaven@ugent.be). Secondly we will have two meetings with specialists of the early modern period who will introduce to you the work of a famous scholar by whom they are inspired in their own scholarly work (Inspired by…).

GEMS in portraits: Thomas Van der Goten

Frost Fair portrait of Anne 1716
We close the summer of 2017 with a portrait of Thomas Van der Goten, who recently received his PhD with a thesis on the eighteenth-century English ode. His dissertation offered a revisionist and genre-theoretical study of a large body of odes, providing a nuanced account of the range and variety of the genre, its engagement with literary tradition, and its place in the proliferating market for printed poetry. His interests range from classical as well as early modern and Romantic literature, over lyric poetry, to print culture, material culture, book history, and the history of reading. As a passionate dix-huitiemist, he is currently working on a postdoc application on the poetry of occasions in eighteenth-century Britain. GEMS wishes him the best of luck!

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Workshop theatre historiography

GEMS and THALIA would like to inform you of the following workshop, which is organised by members Kornee van der Haven, Sarah Adams and Yannice De Bruyn:

On 13 October 2017 we organize a workshop on theatre historiography in Amsterdam (UvA). Our primary aim is to offer PhD students working on historical theatre and performance a platform to discuss methodological difficulties they encounter in their research. It is a perfect occasion for peer discussion and feedback from more experienced scholars and dramaturgs. By means of introduction, Imre Bésanger (Theater Kwast) will outline his approach to methodology in his work with historical theatre texts. Kornee van der Haven (UGent) will moderate a discussion of Erika Fischer-Lichte’s views on theatre historiography.

Please find the (Dutch) program hereSarah Adams can provide you with more information and/or register your participation.

The image is a 3D visualisation of the Tapissiers theatre in Antwerp (1711) © Timothy De Paepe, 2007-2017.

 

Cervantes’ Hermetic Architectures – a lecture by Frederick de Armas (University of Chicago)

Date: Friday, 13 October 2017
Time: 2.30 pm
Location: Auditorium 1 Jan Broeckx (previously Auditorium A) at the Blandijn, campus Boekentoren, Ghent university

Cervantes’ Hermetic Architectures

Frederick A. de Armas
University of Chicago

Cervantes’ novels are peopled with characters constantly on the move, always going from here to there, pursuing amorous, spiritual, picaresque or chivalric quests. Since these figures often move outside cities, the architectures of Cervantes’ novels are few. As such they call attention to themselves and we may inquire as to their presence and function. While the Inn is one of the most prevalent architectures, it is a hybrid one, combining inside and outside. I am more interested in the home, villa, castle or church in order to see if indeed they abide by the concepts of place and space as delineated Yi-Fu Tuan: “Place is security space is freedom; we are attached to the one and long for the other.” Thus, the architectures in the novel should be equated with security. Can these places guard from the danger outside? Or do these hermetic sites wall-in certain dangers? Can some of these spaces evoke Hermes through the Corpus Hermeticum, thus concealing hermetic mysteries? As a first step in this analysis I will look at a sample of hermetic architectures in Don Quijote, Novelas ejemplares, and Persiles y Sigismunda.

Workshop with Professor Roland Greene on September 1st

We are pleased to announce a special workshop with Professor Roland Greene (Stanford, English Department) on Friday, September 1st. Professor Greene will be our guest on that day for an informal meeting with PhD students and other researchers to talk about ‘How Poetry Remakes the World: Elegy and Epithalamion in Renaissance Poetics’.

In the era of early modern humanism, classical lyric genres such as elegy and epithalamion not only follow received uses but become newly scripted as a negotiation between past and present. Concentrating on these two representative genres, this workshop is an experiment in a revived genre criticism that seeks to recover, in terms of indigenous to the period, how early modern poets and audiences conceived these and other genres at work in their world.

After a short introduction by Professor Greene we will have a discussion about the above mentioned issues. In advance we will read an article of Professor Greene about the early modern elegy and literature as a negation between past and present. Participants also are invited to shortly present their own research projects and questions they are currently dealing with in the second part of the workshop.

The workshop will take place on Friday, September 1st, 2-4 PM in the meeting room 110.060 (Blandijnberg, 1st Floor). You are most cordially invited to attend the workshop. Please confirm your attendance as soon as possible by sending an e-mail to Cornelis.vanderHaven@UGent.be .

Roland Greene is an expert on the early modern literatures of England, Latin Europe and the Trans-Atlantic world. His research pays particular attention to the history of poetry and poetics from the Renaissance to the present day. This year he serves as the president of the Modern Language Association. His theme for the 2016 Annual Convention is “Literature and its Publics: Past, Present, and Future”. His most recent book is Five Words: Critical Semantics in the Age of Shakespeare and Cervantes (Chicago, 2013). Five Words proposes an understanding of early modern culture through the changes embodied in five words or concepts over the sixteenth century: in English, bloodinvention language resistance, and world, and their counterparts in French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese. In the seminar he will be discussing this book next to the history and theory of the poetry of the Americas. The seminar is open to all PhD student