GEMS in portraits: Anne-Laure Van Bruaene

What is it that GEMS is doing? What is our work? What are our thoughts, our ideas? Why are we fascinated by the early modern period?
From now on we will turn a spotlight on one of our members every three months. Each portrait will give you another perspective on GEMS.

Picture 032

For this first interview of the academic year, we chose to leave for the History Department to talk with professor Anne-Laure van Bruaene. Anne-Laure obtained her PhD in History with a dissertation on the chambers of rhetoric and urban culture in the Southern Netherlands (1400-1650). She now teaches (and has widely published on) early modern and urban history at Ghent University. She is part of the Belgian-Dutch interuniversity network “City and Society in the Low Countries (ca. 1200 – ca. 1850)”, a project which is now reaching its final research phase. In 2006 she was the laureate of the William Nelson Prize (Renaissance Society of America) for the best article in Renaissance Quarterly. One day back from her sabbatical, Anne-Laure sits lively at her desk when we enter to level our questions. Continue reading

Academic award for GEMS-member Sarah Adams

Title page Monzongo, of de koningklyke slaaf (Van Winter 1774). Slave Zambiza attacks commander Alvarado.

Title page Monzongo, of de koningklyke slaaf (Van Winter 1774). Slave Zambiza attacks commander Alvarado.

GEMS-member Sarah Adams is awarded the biennial prize of the Maatschappij der Nederlandse Letterkunde (Society of Dutch Literature) for the best master thesis on Dutch literature. Sarah examined the power of antislavery theatre in the Dutch abolitionist discussion around 1800 (supervisor: Kornee van der Haven). With this master dissertation, she graduated in Historical Linguistics and Literature at Ghent University (2015). Sarah is preparing a PhD-proposal on antislavery theatre in the Netherlands in the period of 1775-1825.

For the official notice: http://www.mijnedlet.nl/mdnl/?p=1174

 

GEMS in portraits: Britt Dams

What is it that GEMS is doing? What is our work? What are our thoughts, our ideas? Why are we fascinated by the early modern period?
From now on we will turn a spotlight on one of our members every three months. Each portrait will give you another perspective on GEMS.

MapaRIogrande

The third person we want to portray is Britt Dams. In February 2016, Britt obtained her doctoral degree with a dissertation on the description of Dutch Brazil (1624-1654). Currently, she is teaching a course on the history of Brazil at the Catholic University of Leuven. And in Ghent, Britt is still working as a French and Portuguese language instructor at the University Language Centre of Ghent University. Britt is a passionate storyteller, who knows just how to convince people to go travelling throughout Latin America.

Continue reading

May 2nd & 10th: DS seminar with Rodolphe Gasché

Our sixth guest of the Doctoral Course Histories and Theories of Reading is Rodolphe Gasché (State University of New York at Buffalo).

Central to the seminar will be Gasché’s most recent book: Deconstruction, Its Force, Its Violence (2016).

Time schedule and locations:Gasche

preparatory reading session:
Monday 2 May – 9:30 – 12:00.
Location: Large Meeting Room (Blandijn, third floor)

session with Rodolphe Gasché
Tuesday 10 May – 14:30 – 17:30.
Location: Room “Mortier” (Faculty Library)

Registration for the specialist course is required. See here or here for more information on registration and on the entire course.

April 26th & May 3rd: DS seminar with William Marx

Our fifth guest of the Doctoral Course Histories and Theories of Reading is William Marx (Université de Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense).

MarxWe will read ‘Du tremblement de terre de Lisbonne à Auschwitz et Adorno: la crise de la poésie’ (2005), ‘Penser les arrière-gardes’ (2004/2008), ‘La véritable catharsis aristotélicienne : pour une lecture philologique et physiologique de la Poétique’ (2011), ‘Est-il possible de parler de la fin de la littérature?’ (2012), and ‘Brève histoire de la forme en littérature’ (2013).

Time schedule and location:

Tuesday, 26 April, 2016, 9:30 am – Faculty of Arts & Philosophy Library ‘Room Mortier’: preparatory session.

Tuesday, 3 May, 2016, 9:30 amLarge Meeting Room (Blandijn, third floor): session with William Marx.

Registration for the specialist course is required. See here or here for more information on registration and on the entire course.

March 24th, 2016: Lecture Jonathan Culler

Culler_BaudelairewithoutBenjaminIt is our pleasure to invite you to the lecture ‘Baudelaire without Benjamin’ that will be given by Professor. Dr. Jonathan Culler on Thursday March 24. The lecture will take place at Room Jozef-Plateau (Ghent University, building Plateau-Rozier), from 4 pm to 6 pm.

Jonathan Culler is Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cornell University. In 2015, his Theory of the Lyric was published, in which Culler offers us a bright, new and challenging view on the tradition of the lyric. Culler has also worked on 19th-century French literature (especially on Flaubert and Baudelaire), and on contemporary literary theory and criticism (especially structuralism, deconstruction and French theory generally). Other books that he has written are (amongst others): Flaubert: The Uses of Uncertainty (1974), Structuralist Poetics (1975), The Pursuit of Signs (1981), On Deconstruction (1982), Barthes (1983), and Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction (1997).

Jonathan Culler will be visiting our university as part of our doctoral seminar series: Histories and Theories of Reading. In the seminar he will be discussing his most recent book on the theory of the lyric next to his work on literary theory in general. The seminar is open to all PhD students. Information on attending the doctoral seminar or future seminars can be found here.

You are most cordially invited to attend the lecture. Please confirm your attendance by sending an email to britt.grootes@ugent.be. We look forward to seeing you at the lecture.

 

February 26th: PhD Defence

Britt Dams will publicly defend her PhD thesis “Comprehending the New World in the Early Modern Period: Descriptions of Dutch Brazil (1624-1654)” on friday February 26 at 4PM, in auditorium A at Henri Dunantlaan 1 (Ghent).