GEMS Seminar: MA Students inspired by…

Wednesday, April 24th, 2019 (1.30-6 PM): Inspired by…, with presentations by master students

Blandijnberg 2, Grote Vergaderzaal Engels, 3rd floor

This month we will have a special session of our GEMS Seminar Inspired by… with Master students, who will present the first outcomes of their master thesis, reflecting also on those thinkers by whom they are inspired.

PROGRAMME

13:30: Zoë Van Cauwenberg inspired by… Kocku von Stuckrad

14:30: Fauve Vandenberghe inspired by… Michael McKeon

15:30 Break

16:00: Olivier Bodart … inspired by Marie-Laure Ryan

17:00: Jessica Van Wynsberge inspired by… Antonio Damasio

18:00: Reception

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Zoë Van Cauwenberg inspired by… Kocku von Stuckrad

The historiographical construal of the relation between science and religion in terms of conflict has long posed a methodological crux in the study of early modern alchemy. To transcend this dichotomous model Kocku von Stuckrad proposes a model of interference that enables us to examine the junctures and mutual dependencies between cultural systems, such as religion and science. This model is especially fruitful when approaching early modern alchemy, a discipline that is often interpreted as either a semi-mystical religious pursuit of self-purification, or as an instance of antiquated science and technology devoted to the unlimited accumulation of wealth. My research moves beyond this debate and studies the reciprocal relation between theology and natural philosophy in early modern alchemy. To this end, I examine De Artificio Supernaturali (1594), a treatise written by Gerhard Dorn (c. 1530/5 – after 1584), an illustrious renaissance alchemist that has received little scholarly attention. Dorn’s alchemy and his alchemical practice serve as a focal point for investigating early modern notions of the precise relation of the physical and the metaphysical and how these two cohere in the alchemist’s expectations and self-understanding.

Fauve Vandenberghe inspired by… Michael McKeon

Michael McKeon, one of the most influential theorists of the early novel, recently wrote a book on the now largely forgotten genre of the secret history and how its features gradually became domesticated in the novel. This thesis takes McKeon’s idea of the “privatization” of the secret history as its starting point and looks at how Eliza Haywood engages with the genre in her early fiction. Haywood has firmly been established as one of the key figures who helped shape the novel, but critics have become sceptical about how such teleological conceptions of the rise of the novel limit our understanding of her work. Instead, they argue for a more nuanced understanding of the wide variety of genres within which she experimented. This thesis begins to put into practice such calls by looking at how she interacts with the secret history. Haywood’s indebtedness to the genre has proven to be fruitful ground for critics who have tried to ascertain her political affinities throughout her career, but her less overtly political texts have largely escaped such analytical scrutiny. More specifically, then, I look at how she plays with its narratological complexities in such texts that are not usually considered secret histories, namely Fantomina (1725) and The Masqueraders (1724).

Olivier Bodart … inspired by Marie-Laure Ryan

In recent narrative theory we notice a tendency toward the transmedial studies, especially the notion of transmedia storytelling has attained success. This is a process in which integral elements of a fiction get dispersed systematically across multiple delivery channels for the purpose of creating a unified and coordinated entertainment experience, a transmedia storyworld.

Inspired by the pioneering work of Marie-Laure Ryan in the field of transmediality and storyworld-theory, I would like to expand on this transmedia storytelling and transmedia storyworld in my thesis, since I believe that the purposely created unity, in which a “world” component is central, is too restrictive. I would like to hypothesize that representations of a certain narrative unit (/entity/existent), dispersed across different media, unintentionally create a fluid entity, that I will call transmedial narrative cloud. To test this hypothesis I will study the modern, transmedial representations of the Picaro-figure. During my presentation, I will thus critically review Ryan’s work and discuss her importance to my research, while illustrating this with picaro-representations of late 20th century.

Jessica Van Wynsberge inspired by… Antonio Damasio

My thesis is about the role the cognitive sciences could play in the field of literary theory. Ever since the so-called ‘cognitive turn’ in literary studies, scholars have increasingly turned to the interdisciplinary field of cognitive sciences to analyse the expression and representation of emotions in literary texts throughout history. In my presentation I will reflect upon some of the different definitions of emotion that are currently in circulation within this field, some deriving from ‘affective science’ (the empirical study of emotions), others from a set of theories used by cultural scientists that is broadly referred to as ‘affect theory’. The thinker I will focus on more specifically is Antonio Damasio, a professor in neuroscience, who writes about the narrative nature of consciousness.

In both Descartes’ error (1995) and The Feeling of what happens (1999) Damasio describes emotions as physical states arising from the body’s response to external stimuli. In his work he presents a theory about causal sequences, series of events that cause physical reactions we can feel and reflect upon. This process is, in his view, narrative by nature and plays an important role in the construction of our sense of self. Relying on Damasio’s work, I want to examine how the cognitive sciences could be used in the study and analysis of historical texts, meanwhile also posing the question how the study of literature might contribute to our understanding of the history of the human mind.

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GEMS Lecture 2018 with Professor Craig Martin (Università Ca’ Foscari, Venice)

Astrological Debates in Italian Renaissance Commentaries on Aristotle’s Meteorology

Date: Friday, 5 October 2018
Time: 4 PM
Location: Room 100.072 Blandijnberg 2, Gent

Astrologia, Giulio Bonasone, naar Rafaël, 1544From the time of Albertus Magnus, medieval commentators on Aristotle regularly used a passage from Meteorology 1.2 as evidence that the stars and planets influence and even govern terrestrial events. Many of these commentators integrated their readings of this work with the view that planetary conjunctions were causes of significant changes in human affairs. By the end of the sixteenth century, Italian Aristotelian commentators and astrologers alike deemed this passage as authoritative for the integration of astrology with natural philosophy. Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, however, criticized this reading, contending that Aristotle never used the science of the stars to explain meteorological phenomena. While some Italian commentators, such as Pietro Pomponazzi dismissed Pico’s contentions, by the middle of the sixteenth century many reevaluated the medieval integration. This reevaluation culminated in Cesare Cremonini, who put forth an extensive critique of astrology in which he argued against the idea of occult causation and celestial influence, as he tried to rid Aristotelianism of its medieval legacy.

Admission to this public lecture is free, but pre-registration is recommended for anyone who is not a member of GEMS – please send a message to: gems_ugent@yahoo.com

Image: Astrologia (1544) by Giulio Bonasone after Raphael. Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

 

Audio recording of the Atelier with Frans-Willem Korsten (2017-10-20)

 

On October 20th, Frans-Willem Korsten was invited by GEMS to present his upcoming book, A Dutch Republican Baroque. In an interview by Jürgen Pieters, the author discussed some of the key issues raised in his thought-provoking book, after which the audience was invited to join the discussion. If you click here, you will be redirected to an audio recording of the entire Atelier (1.30h). Around the end, Frans-Willem showed a small fragment of one of Maradona’s famous goals to illustrate his understanding of the concept ‘dramatic moment.’

 

Cervantes’ Hermetic Architectures – a lecture by Frederick de Armas (University of Chicago)

Date: Friday, 13 October 2017
Time: 2.30 pm
Location: Auditorium 1 Jan Broeckx (previously Auditorium A) at the Blandijn, campus Boekentoren, Ghent university

Cervantes’ Hermetic Architectures

Frederick A. de Armas
University of Chicago

Cervantes’ novels are peopled with characters constantly on the move, always going from here to there, pursuing amorous, spiritual, picaresque or chivalric quests. Since these figures often move outside cities, the architectures of Cervantes’ novels are few. As such they call attention to themselves and we may inquire as to their presence and function. While the Inn is one of the most prevalent architectures, it is a hybrid one, combining inside and outside. I am more interested in the home, villa, castle or church in order to see if indeed they abide by the concepts of place and space as delineated Yi-Fu Tuan: “Place is security space is freedom; we are attached to the one and long for the other.” Thus, the architectures in the novel should be equated with security. Can these places guard from the danger outside? Or do these hermetic sites wall-in certain dangers? Can some of these spaces evoke Hermes through the Corpus Hermeticum, thus concealing hermetic mysteries? As a first step in this analysis I will look at a sample of hermetic architectures in Don Quijote, Novelas ejemplares, and Persiles y Sigismunda.

Out now: The hurt(ful) body: Performing and beholding pain, 1600-1800

A few years ago, GEMS was one of the co-organisers of the conference ‘The Hurt(ful) Body before Diderot: Pain and Suffering in Early Modern Performance and the Visual Arts (c. 1600-1790)‘. A volume based on this conference appeared last week at Manchester University Press, edited by Tomas Macsotay, Karel Vanhaesebrouck and Cornelis van der Haven. This book offers a cross-disciplinary approach to pain and suffering in the early modern period, based on research in the fields of literary studies, art history, theatre studies, cultural history and the study of emotions. It has a sustained focus on visual sources, textual material and documents about actual events rather than well-known thinkers or ‘masterpieces’ of art history, and a preference for cases and historical contexts over systematic theory-building.

The hurt(ful) body brings under discussion visual and performative representations of embodied pain, using an insistently dialectical approach that takes into account the perspective of the hurt body itself, the power and afflictions of its beholder and, finally, the routinising and redeeming of hurt within institutional contexts. The volume’s two-fold approach of the hurt body, defining ‘hurt’ both from the perspective of the victim and the beholder (as well as their combined creation of a gaze), is unique. It establishes a double perspective about the riddle of ‘cruel’ viewing by tracking the shifting cultural meanings of victims’ bodies, and confronting them to the values of audiences, religious and popular institutional settings, and practices of punishment. It encompasses both the victim’s presence as an image or performed event of pain and the conundrum of the look – the transmitted ‘pain’ experienced by the watching audience. This will be done through three rubrics: the early modern performing body, beholder or audience responses, and the operations of institutional power.

Because of its interdisciplinary approach of the history of pain and the hurt(ful) body, the book will be of interest for Lecturers and students from different fields, like the history of ideas, the history of the body, urban history, theatre studies, literary studies, art history, emotion studies and performance studies

With contributions by Christian Biet, Jonathan Sawday, Javier Moscoso and others.

See also the Q&A with the editors

Foucault seminar

foucault5Coming June, Ghent University doctoral schools will offer the seminar Practicing Foucault : truth, conduct and politics. It is intended for PhD students in the humanities (history, literary studies, philosophy) whose research can benefit from an encounter with the work of Michel Foucault.

The seminar’s format combines masterclasses of external speakers with presentations by PhD students and discussions of Foucault’s lectures. Lecturers are Maarten Van Dyck (Ghent University), Steven Vanden Broecke (Ghent University), Jean-Lucien Sanchez (CNRS), Florence Hulak (Université Paris 8), and Luca Paltrinieri (Université de Rennes).

The language of the course will be bilingual English / French. The maximum number of participants is 20. The exact dates of the seminar are June 22, 29 and 30, 2017. 

For more information, click here. For registration, please contact Egon Bauwelinck.

GEMS Atelier Seminar – December 2, 2015 (Dutch)

Beste GEMS-leden,

Graag willen we u uitnodigen voor de GEMS-bijeenkomst op woensdag 2 december, van 14 tot 16 uur in de grote vergaderzaal (Blandijn, 3de verdieping, 130.007). Tijdens deze bijeenkomst zullen twee GEMS-leden hun onderzoek presenteren. Het moet het begin zijn van een reeks bijeenkomsten over het onderzoek dat binnen onze onderzoeksgroep wordt uitgevoerd en Ine Kiekens en Sarah Adams zullen die dag de spits afbijten. Wie interesse heeft om op een van de vervolgbijeenkomsten acte de présence te geven, kan dit een van de ondertekenden laten weten.

Ine vertelt op 2 december over haar lopende doctoraatsproject over het 14de-eeuwse mystieke traktaat Vanden twaelf dogheden als case-study naar de functies, verspreiding en impact van spirituele literatuur in de Middelnederlandse letteren. Sarah presenteert haar onderzoeksplannen voor het project ‘Slavery on Scene’, over de wijze waarop het Nederlandse toneel omstreeks 1800 vormgaf aan het debat over slavernij.

Hopelijk tot ziens op 2 december!

Met vriendelijke groet,
mede namens Jürgen Pieters en Alexander Roose,

Kornee van der Haven